Apr 21, 2024  
2022-23 Catalog 
    
2022-23 Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: Content may no longer be accurate.

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • RHS 4250 - Rehabilitation for Rehabilitation Sciences majors

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $45.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Goniometers, inclinometers, hand sanitizer, Theratubing, Theraband, pool chemicals.
    Description: This course provides an overview of therapeutic exercise as it relates to the rehabilitation process of musculoskeletal injuries for Rehabilitation Sciences majors. This course provides instruction and hands-on techniques in basic therapeutic rehabilitation techniques.
    Pre-requisite(s): RHS 3300 , RHS 3301 , ESS 3450 .
    Note: Must be admitted to the Rehabilitation Sciences (formerly Athletic Therapy) program in order to register for this course.
  
  • RHS 4650 - Management for Rehabilitation Sciences Majors

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem - Online, 2nd Blk Online, 1st Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem - Online, 2nd Blk Online, 1st Blk Online
    Description: Provides an overview of the necessary policies, procedures, maintenance, and daily operation of healthcare facilities. Applies principles of facility design and planning, information management, legal and ethical considerations in healthcare, and professional development as it relates to future healthcare professionals.
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: RHS 4890 .
  
  • RHS 4800 CRE - Individual Projects

    Credits: (1-4)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A comprehensive study or project in the field of Athletic Training. Hours to be arranged for seniors only.
    May be repeated 3 times up to 16 credit hours.
  
  • RHS 4810 - Experimental Course

    Credits: (1-6)
    Experimental
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title will appear on student’s transcript along with the authorized credit.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • RHS 4890 INT - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (1-6)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Provides academic credit for on-the-job experience.
    May be repeated 5 times and up to 6 credit hours.
    Note: Must be admitted to the Rehabilitation Sciences program to register for this course.
  
  • RHS 4999 - Special Topics in Rehabilitation Sciences

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 2nd Blk, 2nd Blk Online, 1st Blk, 1st Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: 2nd Blk, 2nd Blk Online, 1st Blk, 1st Blk Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: 2nd Blk, 2nd Blk Online, 1st Blk, 1st Blk Online
    Description: This course will focus on introducing students to special topics which may include but are not limited to: women’s health, instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization, or sacroiliac joint conditions.
  
  • SBS 1810 - Experimental Course

    Credits: (1-6)
    Experimental
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • SBS 2810 - Experimental Course

    Credits: (1-6)
    Experimental
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • SBS 2920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • SCM 2400 - Fundamentals of Project Management

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Provides practical knowledge and skills for managing a project from inception to completion to meet time, cost, and performance objectives. Prepares students from all backgrounds to successfully perform the role of a project manager in any profit or non-profit context, including business, government, engineering, healthcare, arts, humanities, or education. Topics include management of project teams, stakeholders, communications, schedule, cost, scope, performance and risk for achieving project success.
  
  • SCM 2890 - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (1-3)
    Description: Open to students meeting criteria established by the SCM program. Provides academic credit for selected on-the job experience. Grade and amount of credit will be determined by the department.
    Pre-requisite(s): Instructor Approval.
  
  • SCM 2920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title with the credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • SCM 3050 - Operations and Supply Chain Management

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Supply chain management is the value creation engine of every organization.  The focus of this course is to acquaint students with the core elements of supply chain management: 1) customer value, 2) collaborative value creation, and 3) systems thinking.  The course introduces and defines the three primary functions that compose supply chain activities- 1) purchasing, 2) operations, and 3) logistics-and shows how they need to work together to create the high-quality, low-cost, and innovative products and services that customers expect to find in today’s marketplace.  Important analytical tools are introduced.
    Pre-requisite(s): Earn a “C” or better in MATH 1010 , MATH 1050 , MATH 1080  or MATH 1210 ; or earn a “C” or better in any math course for which either MATH 1010 , MATH 1050 , MATH 1080 , or MATH 1090  is a prerequisite; or score 3 or higher on AP Calculus exam or; score 70 or higher on ACCUPLACER College Level Math (CLM) or; score of 23 or higher on Math ACT or; score of 55 or higher on ALEKS.

     

  
  • SCM 3500 - Spreadsheet Modeling for Prescriptive Analytics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Spreadsheet software enables business people to model and analyze quantitative problems in a wide variety of business contexts.  This course covers spreadsheet modeling in terms of optimization models for deciding the best set of decisions to meet constraints and performance objectives; simulation models for considering uncertainty in business operations and decisions; and other decision models and tools.  Through conceptual and applied topics, this course will enhance one’s problems solving and modeling capabilities as well as Excel spreadsheet skills.
    Pre-requisite(s): MIS 2010 , QUAN 2600 .
  
  • SCM 3600 - Logistics & Transportation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course incorporates readings, site visits, and case analysis to convey state-of-the-art and emerging business logistics practices. The focus of this course is on forecasting, inventory management, transportation, distribution and warehousing, with an introduction to contemporary issues in logistics such HADR and sustainability.  Development of leading-edge strategies, which promote a firm’s ability to differentiate itself in terms of its supply chain performance is emphasized.
    Pre-requisite(s): BSAD 2899 ; SCM 3050 
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: SCM 3500 .

     

  
  • SCM 3700 - Purchasing & Strategic Sourcing

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course provides students an introduction to the supply management discipline, focusing on the development of category management skills and the purchasing process.  Companies have always sourced a large percent of their COGS–up to 50-80%.  However, today’s emphasis on core competencies and increased use of outsourcing makes sourcing even more strategic.  Sourcing managers are responsible for managing supplier capacity and capabilities.  The course emphasizes costing and relationship management tools.  This course builds the foundation for students to pass the Certified Profession in Supply Management (CPSM) exam.
    Pre-requisite(s): SCM 3050 
  
  • SCM 4100 - Quality Management and Process Improvement

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Introduces principles and practices for achieving quality, customer satisfaction, and performance excellence.  Emphasis on process improvement, problem-solving, variation and statistical thinking, customer and supplier relationships, service quality, employee involvement, project management, and quality management frameworks.  Presents tools and methods for analyzing and improving business processes, including Six Sigma, lean, and theory of constraints. This course builds the foundation for students to pass the ASQ Certified Quality Process Analyst exam.
    Pre-requisite(s): BSAD 2899 ; SCM 3050 ; or Instructor Permission.
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: QUAN 3610 .
  
  • SCM 4400 - Global Supply Chain Management

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Globalization has changed the rules of competition.  Globalization also raises complex and controversial issues such as job displacement and worker exploitation.  Winning companies now use worldwide resources to meet the needs of global consumers.  This course introduces and is built around a scanning model.  Students are expected to actively scan, using emerging information to identify inflection points and determine their strategic and tactical implication.  From this analysis, strategic objectives are renewed to guide the design of a global supply chain.  Effective communication and teamwork are emphasized via the in class activities and projects.
    Pre-requisite(s): BSAD 2899  and SCM 3050 .
  
  • SCM 4500 - Supply Chain Relational Skills

    Credits: (3)
    Description: This course focuses on developing the relational and communication skills necessary for success as a supply chain professional. Key elements of the course include perspectives on supply chain strategic relationships, managing communication and conflict, building trust and collaboration with work groups and teams, managing change processes, and ethical negotiation, all with emphasis on supply chain contexts. Students build critical skills for developing strategic relationships and effectively communicating information and decisions. The course equips students with practical skills in critical thinking, perspective taking, change management, negotiation, and written and oral communication
    Pre-requisite(s): SCM 3050  and SCM 3700 .
  
  • SCM 4550 - Strategic Supply Chain Management

    Credits: (3)
    Description: Supply chain management (SCM) is integrative in nature, requiring a systems approach to the design and management of supply chain processes across functions and organizational boundaries. This capstone SCM course provides a summative learning experience in which students integrate and apply their knowledge and skills in simulations, real-world cases, and large-scale data sets. The course emphasizes the conceptual and analytical skills needed to plan, source, make and deliver distinctive customer value in collaboration with supply chain partners. The course also covers current events and emerging topics in today’s supply chains. 
    Pre-requisite(s): SCM 3600  and SCM 3700 .
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: SCM 4100 
  
  • SCM 4700 - Supply Chain Case Analysis, Logic, and Presentation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course is designed around the case analysis methodology and has the explicit goal of preparing student teams for participation in specific competitive supply chain case competitions (both regionally and nationally). Preparation time will be extensive and students must possess an advanced level of SCM mastery prior to enrollment in this class. Class meetings will be scheduled with the students throughout the semester for presentation and preparation. Please see the instructor for information on enrollment eligibility.  Credit/no credit grading.
    Pre-requisite(s): SCM 3050 , instructor approval.
  
  • SCM 4800 - Independent Research

    Credits: (1-3)
    Description: Independent undergraduate research under the direction of a faculty member.
    Pre-requisite(s): Advanced Standing; Instructor Approval.
    May be repeated until a total of 4 hours credit is accumulated.
  
  • SCM 4805 - Directed Study

    Credits: (1-3)
    Description: Independent readings and learning activities on advanced special topics under the direction of a faculty mentor.
    Pre-requisite(s): Advanced Standing; Instructor Approval.
  
  • SCM 4840 - Operations & Supply Chain Industry Projects

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Early in their careers, many choose to work for a management consulting company or get involved in rotations within a company. These jobs and programs expose the worker to a wide variety of job types and functions and prepare the worker for whatever opportunities the future may bring. In this course, students are exposed to operations and supply chain management consulting projects typical of what they could expect in a full-time consulting position or in a company’s early-career leadership rotation program.
    Pre-requisite(s): SCM 3500 .
    Co-Requisite(s): SCM 3600  and SCM 3700 .
    May be repeated up to two times for a total of 6 hours of credit.
  
  • SCM 4850 - Supply Chain Management Study Abroad

    Credits: (1-3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course is designed for students who wish to explore supply chain management theory and practice in countries other than the U.S.  Students will study global supply chain management as offered through a partner university (or other university with department chair approval).
    Pre-requisite(s): BSAD 2899 .
    Can be repeated once up to 6 credits.
  
  • SCM 4860 INT - Supply Chain Management Internship

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A structured professional-level field experience. The student will be counseled and supervised as he/she applies and integrates the knowledge and skills obtained through operations management and logistics courses.
    Pre-requisite(s): BSAD 2899 ; Senior Standing; Instructor approval.
  
  • SCM 4920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title with the credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • SE 6010 - Foundation of Systems Engineering

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: The Foundations of Systems Engineering course is an introductory overview of the systems engineering perspective and is presented to set the conceptual and practical framework of the entire systems engineering graduate program. The course covers the foundational components of systems engineering, from the concept development stage through the process steps of engineering development. Several issues related to post-development, disposal, and special topics areas are also presented.
  
  • SE 6020 - Engineering Project and Program Management

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: The Engineering Project and Program Management course provides participants the opportunity to gain skills and experience applying the framework, processes, and knowledge areas of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) as defined by the Project Management Institute (PMI).  Students apply methods and tools through in-class lab work, deliverables, and portfolio generation.
  
  • SE 6110 - Design Project

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: MSSE Students are required to complete a system engineering design project that demonstrates proficiency in research, design, analysis, implementation, testing and documentation.  The project is an in-depth study selected by the student or course instructor to showcase the student’s skills and knowledge.
    Pre-requisite(s): SE 6010  and SE 6020  and SE 6130  and SE 6140  and SE 6150 .

     

  
  • SE 6120 - System Design and Operational Analysis

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: This course targets systems engineering professionals. It will prepare you to take the International Requirements Engineering Board’s certification exam, to elicit and analyze requirements, document and validate requirements, create UML and SysML use cases, manage requirements, and demonstrate systems requirements for a development project.
    Suggested Requisite(s): Calculus and Basic Statistics.
  
  • SE 6130 - Overview of Systems Engineering Processes

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: An overview of system life-cycle design processes and the associated analysis techniques.  Approaches to system reliability, maintainability and failure analysis are also explored.
    Pre-requisite(s): SE 6010 .
  
  • SE 6140 - Design for Operational Feasibility

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: This course will introduce the application of engineering and management efforts to maximize the likelihood that the resulting system design will be operationally feasible and perform as intended in an effective and efficient manner. The objective of the course is to study the characteristics that are known to have a significant impact on the success of a system and the customer’s need. Topics include Design for reliability, maintainability, human factors, logistics, producibility, and affordability.
  
  • SE 6150 - Research Methods and Experimentation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: The course introduces the participant to research methods and experimentation, including surveys, case studies, stratification, comparative experiments, regression, and design of experiments.  The course emphasizes practical decision-making processes, both intuitive and logical; qualitative and quantitative.  A review of practical descriptive, comparative, and relational statistics is leveraged to explore and apply advanced methods.  
  
  • SE 6260 - Reliability Engineering and Risk Analysis

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: An introduction to reliability engineering and risk analysis, including its role in Systems Engineering.  Approaches to risk identification, quantification, and reduction will be discussed.  Tools, techniques, and methodologies for use in system design, reliability engineering, and project management are emphasized.
    Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1040  or MFET 2410  or MATH 3410 ; and MATH 1210 
  
  • SE 6320 - Simulation Modeling and Engineering Optimization: Methods/Applications

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: This course will introduce methods of optimization, simulation, and analysis for a variety of complex systems -including linear optimization,non-linear optimization,and data modeling. It will also introduce business analytics, the types of business analytics and their uses and advantages. Students will apply business analytics and modeling techniques to improve design for feasibility concepts of a complex system. Software used will include SQL, Visual Basic, Excel, and similar languages.
  
  • SE 6350 - Organizational Systems

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: Organizational Systems provides engineers with organizational-level skills to recognize, develop, analyze, improve, and sustain organizational subsystems. The course blends the most useful mental models from organizational theory and design, industrial psychology, and organizational behavior. Participants complete multiple applied deliverables to connect theory and application. Open systems thinking, structural design, internal design elements, and managing dynamic processes frame the content.
  
  • SE 6360 - System Logistics: Ensuring a System of Systems Approach

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: 2nd Block Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: System of systems is a collection of task-oriented or dedicated systems that pool their resources and capabilities together to create a new, more complex system which offers more functionality and performance than simply the sum of the constituent systems. This course will introduce the subsequent sustaining maintenance & support of the system throughout its entire life cycle, including end of life/disposal. It will also include different DoD tailorable concepts to effectively manage and field product.  Topics include: Reliability Growth, Initial Contractor Support (ICS), and Performance-Based Logistics (PBL)Sytems of Systems (SoS) or Federation of Systems (FoS).
    Suggested Requisite(s): Calculus and Basic Statistics.
  
  • SE 6370 - Requirement Engineering

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: This course targets systems engineering professional. It will prepare you to take the International Requirements Engineering Board’s certification exam, to elicit and analyze requirements, document and validate requirements, create UML and SysML use cases, manage requirements, and demonstrate systems requirements for a development project.
  
  • SE 6380 - Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) and SysML

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course fees for this course are designed to cover computer labs, paper usage, software, equipment maintenance and replacement, supplies and instructional resources.
    Description: Introduction to formal system architecture methods using the Systems Modeling Language (SysML) and Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) with detailed case studies. Students will apply the methodology to build architecture models, analyze internal and external interactions, and plan appropriate approaches for implementation. Topics include digital engineering, iterative MBSE techniques, model structure interactions and behaviors based on requirements and constraints, and creating key diagrams (such as use-case, sequence, and activity)
    Pre-requisite(s): SE 6010  or SE 6130 

     

  
  • SE 6900 - Special Topics

    Credits: (1-4)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Description: A one-time special study course designed to introduce a new relevant topic that is not covered in the Systems  Engineering programs. Lecture or lecture and lab combination. Laboratory activities support the selected course topic.
    Pre-requisite(s): Permission from the department.
    May be repeated 10 times and up to 12 credit hours.
  
  • SE 6910 - Individual Research

    Credits: (1-3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Description: Students taking this course will receive credit for approved, mentored studies in the Master of Science in Systems Engineering (MSSE). A maximum of three credits may be counted toward graduation.
    Pre-requisite(s): Permission from the department.
  
  • SOC 1010 SS/DV - Introduction to Sociology

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 1st Blk, Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Description: An introduction to the study of Sociology through the concepts and principles used to understand and evaluate society. It focuses on all aspects of society: culture; social interaction; institutions; group processes; deviance and social control; stratification, diversity, and inequality based on race, ethnicity, class, gender, etc.; and social stability and change.
  
  • SOC 1020 SS/DV - Social Problems

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 2nd Blk, Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Description: A study of major social problems in contemporary society, including issues of age, gender, family, race, ethnicity, wealth and poverty, politics, education, public safety, health care, substance abuse, and environment. Special emphasis is given to these issues and their consequences for today’s global and diverse society.
  
  • SOC 2370 - Sociology of Gender

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description:

    This course examines gender as an organizing principle of social life and the ways in which gender influences individuals’ identities, behaviors, and life experiences. Students will study gender within a variety of contexts, such as the workplace, family, politics, athletics, education, health, media, and religion. Attention will also be given to sociological theories of gender, gender socialization, and the intersection of gender, race, class, and sexuality.

  
  • SOC 2400 SS - Introduction to Ethnic Studies

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Description: This course is an introduction to the study of race and ethnicity, especially through the experiences of ethnic minority groups in the United States. We will explore the main perspectives, theories, findings, and other features, focusing especially on how social systems define and shape racial understandings and outcomes as well as continuing efforts to dismantle racial oppression.
  
  • SOC 2600 - Sociology of Family

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description:

    The course analyzes family arrangements and structures, changes in such arrangements over time, and contemporary issues facing families. Emphasis is placed on variations in family experiences with regard to race, gender, social class, and sexual orientation. Students examine the relationship between families and other social institutions such as politics, religion, and the economy.

  
  • SOC 2810 - Experimental Course

    Credits: (1-6)
    Experimental
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
    Note: This course is offered as needed. Please check with the department for availability.
  
  • SOC 2920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
    Note: This course is offered as needed. Please check with the department for availability.
  
  • SOC 3000 - Self and Society

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: Sociological Social Psychology is the study of individual, group, and social behavior through analysis of the relationship between individuals and social institutions. Individuals actively create social structure while they are simultaneously shaped by it. Students will analyze how social interaction, processes, roles, and statuses are created and maintained by individuals. Students will also analyze how these same processes, roles, and statuses shape their individual behavior. Social Psychological theories and methodologies are also addressed.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020 .
  
  • SOC 3010 - Social Inequality

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: The study of social stratification and inequality in the United States and globally. The course focuses on economic class and status groups, such as gender, race and ethnicity, age, sexuality, and physical ability.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020 .
  
  • SOC 3030 - Classical Sociological Theory

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A study of the classical tradition of sociological thought in late 18th to early 20th century Europe and 19th to early 20th century U.S. The course introduces the main theories of Comte, Martineau, Marx, Weber, Simmel, Durkheim, and others, including early theorists of gender and race. To be taken before SOC 4030 .
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010 .
  
  • SOC 3250 - Deviance and Social Control

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: Introduces the student to the various sociological concepts of deviance and social control. Deviance and social control are examined in their positive and negative forms. The benefits and contributions as well as the consequences and disruptions of these forms are considered in the context of the formal and informal socialization processes and the internalization of social norms.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020 .
  
  • SOC 3260 - Juvenile Delinquency

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: Juvenile delinquency as a social phenomenon and its causes involving definitions, agencies of law enforcement, and the courts.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020 .
  
  • SOC 3270 - Criminology

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: Study of the nature, extent, causes, and treatment of crime.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020 .
  
  • SOC 3300 - Environment and Society

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: An in-depth study of societal-environmental interactions including population, technology and organization impacts of human societies on the physical environment, and environmental impacts on human behavior and social organization.
  
  • SOC 3400 - Social Change

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: The factors which change society and how society changes, emphasizing technological innovations and its implications, social movements, and the role of individuals.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020 .
  
  • SOC 3410 - Sociology of Religion

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: Examination of religion and religious activities globally from the theoretical perspectives of Sociology.
  
  • SOC 3420 - Sociology of Education

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: Analysis of the structure and function of education as a central social institution in contemporary society.
  
  • SOC 3430 - Medicine and Healthcare in Society

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: Utilizes the Sociological perspective to explore the Institution of Medicine and the Medical Healthcare Delivery System; its function as a social institution and its capability, accessibility, and the related issues of providing Healthcare. The various organizational system structures, and their economic and political dimensions are also examined. Further emphasis is placed on the various professional roles, supporting roles, and patient behaviors. Additional focus is placed upon selected international comparisons, as well as medical research, ethical considerations, and international health issues.
  
  • SOC 3550 - Organizations in Society

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: Surveys the nature and structure of organizations in general and modern formal organizations and globalization in specific. How organizations work, function and affect contemporary society and individuals’ lives and behavior. Sociological theories about modern organizations and globalization will be examined.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010 .
  
  • SOC 3600 - Social Statistics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 1st Blk
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistical analysis techniques and the presentation of results.
    Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1010  or equivalent.
  
  • SOC 3660 - Sociological Research

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 2nd Blk
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Examines the scientific foundations of Sociology and methods of Sociological Research.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020 .
  
  • SOC 3840 - Cities and Urban Life

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: In-depth analysis of the urbanization, modernization, and development of the system of cities. The relationship between cities and culture, mental illness, and social problems are examined.
  
  • SOC 3850 - Race & Ethnicity

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: Examines the social construction of race and ethnicity and the conditions of racial and ethnic groups in the United States and globally, based on statistical and ethnographic data.  Includes a survey of theories of the origins, causes, and dynamics of ethnic and race relations.
  
  • SOC 4030 - Contemporary Sociological Theory

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: The works of major contemporary theorists (Mead, Parsons, Merton, Goffman, Garfinkel, etc.) and the emergence of current schools of sociological thought.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010  and SOC 3030 .
  
  • SOC 4220 - Life in a Consumer Society

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: Examination of consumption, consumerism, and the increasing commercialization of contemporary life.  Students study the history of consumerism and advertising; explore how consumer culture influences their own consumption choices; and analyze the relationship between consumerism and social inequality.
  
  • SOC 4270 - Sociology of Law

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: A study of the interchange between law and society, where society creates the law, yet law regulates society.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010  or SOC 1020 .
  
  • SOC 4300 - Qualitative Methods

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Description: This course provides students with a practical introduction to qualitative research methods, focusing on ethnography, interviewing, and content analysis. Framing qualitative research in the context of contemporary theory and ethical concerns, it provides hands-on exposure to qualitative research’s unique logic, design, practice, analysis, and writing in a variety of research and applied contexts.
    Pre-requisite(s): Junior or Senior standing.
  
  • SOC 4410 - Sociology of Globalization

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: Study of economic, political, and cultural globalization in the late 20th and early 21st century. The course examines the history, theories and critiques of globalization, the key actors in global political-economy, the institutions and events that shape global processes, and globalization’s impact on local economies, politics, culture, and the natural environment.
  
  • SOC 4550 - Sociology of Work

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: Explores the relationship between work and social class, gender, technology, race, and ethnicity. Additionally, the nature of occupational subcultures is analyzed.
  
  • SOC 4810 - Experimental Course

    Credits: (1-6)
    Experimental
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
    Note: This course is offered as needed. Please check with the department for availability.
  
  • SOC 4830 INT - Readings and/or Projects

    Credits: (1-3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Individual readings and/or projects for sociology majors or minors. (Maximum of 5 hours applied toward graduation, 3 of which can be applied toward the sociology major or minor.)
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010 , senior standing, permission of instructor, approval of program coordinator.
    May be repeated 4 times up to 5 credit hours.
  
  • SOC 4890 INT - Internship

    Credits: (1-6)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Qualified juniors and seniors may apply for internships among federal, state and private agencies. Internships are anticipated to provide the student with both practical and research experiences. A student may complete up to 9 hours, but not more than 6 hours in any one type of internship. A maximum of 3 hours may be applied towards the sociological major or sociological minor.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010 , junior or senior status, approval of program coordinator.
    May be repeated 8 times up to 9 credit hours.
  
  • SOC 4900 CRE - Senior Capstone Course

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A course designed to organize all of the knowledge that the student has gleaned from his/her major into an integrated whole. This course will help the student make relevant the knowledge that he/ she has learned. This will be accomplished by having the student write a senior thesis as well as attend lectures.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010 , SOC 3030 , SOC 3600 , SOC 3660 , senior standing.
  
  • SOC 4920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
    Note: This course is offered as needed. Please check with the department for availability.
  
  • SOC 4930 INT - Community Engaged Capstone

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A course designed to organize all of the knowledge that the student has gleaned from his/her major into an integrated whole. This course will help the student make relevant the knowledge that he/ she has learned. This will be accomplished by having the student prepare a project based on a previously completed internship as well as attend lectures. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 , SOC 3030 , SOC 3600 , SOC 3660 , 3 credit hours minimum of SOC 4890 , senior standing.
  
  • SOC 4990 - Seminar in Sociology

    Credits: (3)
    Variable Title
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An advanced course allowing in-depth study of selected topics in Sociology. When the course number is used, it will be accompanied by a specific title with the credit authorized, which will appear on the student transcript.
    Pre-requisite(s): SOC 1010  or consent of instructor.
    May be repeated 3 times up to 9 credit hours.
    Note: (Formerly Contemporary Issues.)
  
  • SPAN 1000 - Proficiency Development

    Credits: (1-2)
    Description: (N=Novice) (Cr/NCr) Non-graded courses for entry-level students to augment foreign language instruction in stress-free activities such as reading children’s literature, learning and performing skits, folk dancing, singing, cooking, etc.
    Suggested Requisite(s): May be repeated for credit under different titles.
    Course not currently being offered.
  
  • SPAN 1010 - First Semester Spanish

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: (N=Novice) Introductory course assuming no significant previous experience with the language. Beginners and students with less than two years of high school language should register for this class. Emphasis on everyday conversation and exposure to cultural perspectives.
  
  • SPAN 1020 - Second Semester Spanish

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: (N=Novice) Continuation of SPAN 1010 . Basic language skills including listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture.
  
  • SPAN 1700 - Conversational Skills

    Credits: (1-3)
    Description: Specific vocabulary and speaking skills in one semester (e.g., nursing, law enforcement, medical, tourism, family language courses, etc.). May be repeated for credit under different titles.
  
  • SPAN 1852 - Study Abroad

    Credits: (1-3)
    Description: (N=Novice) Language and culture studies for students with no previous experience in the target language and culture. Most assignments are performed in English. Prior travel experience does not apply.
    May be repeated twice with a maximum of 3 credit hours.
    Note: Check with Department for course availability.
  
  • SPAN 2000 - Proficiency Development

    Credits: (1-2)
    Description: (NH=Novice High) (CR/NC) Non-graded courses for second-year students to augment foreign language instruction in stress-free activities appropriate to the linguistic level of second-year students. May be repeated under different titles. Note: Course not currently being offered.
  
  • SPAN 2010 - Third Semester Spanish

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: (NH=Novice High) Continuation of FL 1020. Assumes completion of first-year or equivalent experience. Students learn to understand and express ideas about their community and the world. Includes listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture.
  
  • SPAN 2020 HU - Fourth Semester Spanish

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: (NH=Novice High)  Continuation of SPAN 2010 . The learning and application of strategies for acquiring a foreign language. Students also learn how cultural products and practices reflect a culture’s attitudes, values, ideas and meaning. The process of language acquisition and the seeking of cross-cultural understanding provide insights into the commonalities of how the human family learns, thinks and communicates.
  
  • SPAN 2021 - Second Year II

    Credits: (3)
    Description: (NH=Novice High)  Continuation of FL 2010 without General Education Humanities credit. Offered through examination only.
    Pre-requisite(s): Only available through testing.
  
  • SPAN 2030 - Second Year Language Review

    Credits: (3)
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: (NH=Novice High) This course will prepare students who wish to continue language study. Emphasis on conversational skills and a review of language structure and usage.
    Note: Check with department for course availability.
  
  • SPAN 2600 HU - Introduction to Cultural and Literary Studies in Translation

    Credits: (3)
    Variable Title
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: May be offered under any of the languages taught in the department. All Foreign Language HU2600 courses are taught in English and all texts are read in English translation in order to make some of the literature we normally would teach in a foreign language accessible to all students. These courses may introduce students to specific literary periods, literary themes or some prominent authors in specific areas of the world where languages other than English are spoken.
    May be repeated up to 10 times for credit under different titles.
    Note: Check with Department for course availability.
  
  • SPAN 2851 HU - Study Abroad

    Credits: (3)
    Description: (NH=Novice High) Language and culture studies for students whose minimal proficiency is Novice High. Language assignments at the Novice or Intermediate-Low levels are performed in the target language. All other assignments are performed in English. Prior travel experience does not apply.
    Note: Check with Department for course availability.
  
  • SPAN 2852 - Study Abroad

    Credits: (1-3)
    Description: (NH=Novice High) Language and culture studies for students whose minimal proficiency is at Novice High. Language assignments at the Novice or Intermediate-Low levels are performed in the target language. All other assignments are performed in English. Prior travel experience does not apply.
    Twice with a maximum of 3 credit hours.
    Note: Check with Department for course availability.
  
  • SPAN 2920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • SPAN 3000 - Proficiency Development

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: (IL=Intermediate Low) This is a transition course to upper division. The course focuses on oral proficiency development. Students will learn a variety of techniques and strategies to increase their oral proficiency in a variety of social, educational and cultural settings. Native-speaking students or those who have acquired proficiency through residence in the target language community are not eligible to take this class.
  
  • SPAN 3060 - Grammar & Composition

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: (IL=Intermediate Low) Students will read examples of writing in various modes (such as description, narration, exposition, and argument), write short compositions in those modes, and review the necessary grammar to write correctly in those modes.
  
  • SPAN 3116 - DLI Bridge Course I

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Taught in DLI High Schools for students who have passed the AP Exam with a 3 or higher. Although this is a three credit-hour class, it will meet over the course of a full academic year. Credit will count toward a major or minor in the language.
    Pre-requisite(s): SPAN 2020  or AP exam with a score of 3 or better 
  
  • SPAN 3117 - DLI Bridge Course II

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Taught in DLI High Schools for students who have passed the AP Exam with a 3 or higher. Although this is a three credit-hour class, it will meet over the course of a full academic year. Credit will count toward a major or minor in the language.
    Pre-requisite(s): SPAN 2020  or AP exam with a score of 3 or better 
  
  • SPAN 3118 - DLI Bridge Course III

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Taught in DLI High Schools for students who have passed the AP Exam with a 3 or higher. Although this is a three credit-hour class, it will meet over the course of a full academic year. Credit will count toward a major or minor in the language.
    Pre-requisite(s): SPAN 2020  or AP exam with a score of 3 or better 
  
  • SPAN 3160 - Introduction to Literature

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: (IL=Intermediate Low) Required of all majors and minors. 3160 may be taken concurrently with other literature courses. One sheltered section may be offered to students who have not had extensive in-country experience.
    Note: Check with department for course availability.
  
  • SPAN 3220 - Phonetics and Phonology

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: (IL=Intermediate Low) Analysis of the sounds of language and word formation: practice of native like speech patterns. Required of all teaching majors and minors.
    Note: Check with department for course availability.
  
  • SPAN 3270 - Special Topics in Linguistics

    Credits: (3)
    Variable Title
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Maintain technology in the FL lab, EH 408, and classroom technology.
    Description: (IM=Intermediate Mid) An introduction to linguistic structures and semantic elements. The course provides useful information and practice in the language, its structures and usage. The sub-disciplines of linguistics, other than phonetics and phonology (covered in SPAN 3220 ), will be studied. These may include lexical analysis, semantics, morphology, syntax, linguistic change and dialectal variation.
    Note: Check with department for course availability.
 

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