Apr 21, 2024  
2022-23 Catalog 
    
2022-23 Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: Content may no longer be accurate.

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • NRSG 6710 - Advanced Health Assessment for the Nurse Educator

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem Online
    Description: This course lays the groundwork for students to perform comprehensive and holistic health histories, review of systems, and physical examinations for patients.  The overall purpose will be focused upon developing strategies and skills to assess the health care needs of people across the life span. Students are challenged to identify normal assessment findings and critically analyze variations from normal and apply that knowledge for health education. 
    Pre-requisite(s): The student must be officially accepted into the MSN program and have completed the first semester of study prior to registering for NRSG 6710.
  
  • NRSG 6720 - Advanced Pharmacology for the Nurse Educator

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem Online
    Description: This course overviews pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for optimum individual client management. Advanced practice nursing students are prepared to safely monitor medication regimens for patients across the lifespan based on clinically relevant ethical and legal parameters and consideration of evidenced based practice guidelines and protocols for effective pharmacology management and education.
    Pre-requisite(s): The student must be officially accepted into the MSN program and have completed the first semester of study prior to registering for NRSG 6720.
  
  • NRSG 6730 - Advanced Pathophysiology for the Nurse Educator

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem Online
    Description: This course is a core graduate level course. This course is designed to teach the master level nursing student frequently seen alterations in physiology. The course will focus on modifiable risk factors, exposures, physiological mutations, and presenting signs and symptoms. Students will utilize evidence-based practice and research to identify, analyze and evaluate disease pathology across the lifespan.
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: The student must be officially accepted into the MSN program and have completed the first semester of study prior to registering for MSN 6730.
  
  • NRSG 6801 - Integrating Scholarship into Practice

    Credits: (2)
    Description: The NRSG 6801 course is designed as a foundational course to prepare graduates to be information literate and to practice from an evidence-based approach in their direct and indirect advanced nursing roles. In addition, students will begin the compilation of a scholarly paper through identification of a problem in practice and that reflects reflect educational theory, interprofessional collaboration, research, and current standards of practice.  In this course students will be asked to critically appraise research and evidence summaries related to area of practice and apply it to their practice problem.  Completion of 6801 and the MSN Scholarly Project is a graduation requirement for the Master of Science in nursing degree.
    Pre-requisite(s):

    The student must be officially accepted into Weber State University’s MSN program to register for this course. 

  
  • NRSG 6802 - Integrating Scholarship into Practice

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem - Online, 1st Blk Online, 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem - Online, 1st Blk Online, 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem - Online, 1st Blk Online, 2nd Blk Online
    Description:  

    The NRSG 6802 course is designed for graduates to prepare and present a scholarly project through identification of a problem in practice and that reflects a framework, interprofessional collaboration, research, and current standards of practice. Each course addresses sections of the scholarly paper leading to the completion of the project paper and a poster presentation. Completion of 6801, 6802 and the associated MSN Scholarly Project is a graduation requirement for the Master of Science in Nursing degree and provides evidence that the student has engaged in scholarly activities that enhance the practice of nursing at a graduate level.

    NRSG 6802 will be completed during the last semester of the MSN Program. Please note that all students are required to pass all previous courses to progress in the program.  During the semester, the student will complete the following components of the MSN Project:

    • Create the Project Methodology section, which includes the deliverables and the dissemination plan.
    • Create the Implications, Recommendations, and Conclusions sections.
    • Refine and compile the MSN Scholarly Project paper
    • Present the findings to peers and faculty through verbal presentation, and submit final copy of the MSN Project.

    Pre-requisite(s):

    The student must be officially accepted into Weber State University’s MSN program to register for this course and must complete NRSG 6110  and NRSG 6801  with a B- or higher.

  
  • NRSG 6850 - MSN Project Development and Implementation Extension Course

    Credits: (1)
    Description: For students who have completed all course requirements for MSN, but have not completed the MSN project requirement. Students must register for a minimum of 1 credit of NRSG 6850 to remain enrolled in the MSN program.
    Pre-requisite(s): Faculty approval.
    May be repeated two (2) times with a maximum of 2 credit hours.
  
  • NRSG 6860 INT - Fieldwork Practicum

    Credits: (1-9)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This practicum provides students with graduate level health-related fieldwork experience in a self-selected setting, under the direction of a faculty member. Instructor consent required. This is a pass/fail course.
    May be repeated for a maximum of nine credit hours.
  
  • NRSG 6920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • NRSG 7000 - Introduction to DNP Degree

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course allows students to explore how the DNP prepared nurse leader participates in evolving healthcare environments through translation of knowledge for advocacy, quality improvement, systems change, and policy revision. Role transition and professionalism are explored through the foundational DNP practice essentials, identification of healthcare challenges, and the educational and practice requirements for a Post-Masters DNP prepared advance practice nurse.
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be accepted to the DNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7001 - Transitions to Practice I

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course allows students to explore how the DNP prepared FNP participates in evolving healthcare environments through translation of knowledge for leadership, advocacy, quality improvement, and policy revision. Role transition and professionalism are explored through the foundational DNP practice essentials and FNP clinical competencies, identification of practice challenges, and the educational, clinical, and practice requirements for a BSN to DNP-FNP degreed advance practice nurse.
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be accepted to the DNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7002 - Transitions to Practice II

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Description: The course provides students with a foundation for understanding the process and phases of transition to the role of a nurse practitioner, the requirements for credentialing as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP), participation in professional organizations, and regulatory compliance. An understanding of issues related to health policy, healthcare delivery, access and quality of care, ethical and legal role expansion implications, negotiating contracts, billing and reimbursement, and general leadership competencies are presented. Students explore and articulate a variety of nurse practitioner roles including direct and indirect healthcare possibility.
  
  • NRSG 7010 - Scholarly/Ethical Foundations

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course examines scientific, philosophical, and ethical underpinnings of advanced nursing practice including the relationships among theory, research, and practice. Students critically appraise types of evidence in nursing and/or other health care disciplines to begin the initial literature review for the DNP Project.
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be accepted to the DNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7020 - Biostatistics/Epidemiology

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course focuses on the basic tools needed for the collection, analysis, and interpretation of research, in particular findings and recommendations for individuals and population health and health policy. Epidemiological principles, models, and approaches/strategies related to health and illness in at-risk populations are examined. General principle of research design and hypothesis testing are reviewed and research and non-research studies examined for human health and disease treatment.
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be admitted to the DNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7030 - Information Technology to Support Evidence-Based Practice

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Description: This course examines principles of nursing informatics and how they are integrated in health care systems. Advanced informatics skills of database design, knowledge management, clinical decision support, and project management to guide the DNP student in recommending, evaluating, and implementing patient care technologies. This course offers 15 course practicum hours 1:4 credit to clock hours. (0.25 credit = 15 clock hours).
     
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be admitted to the Post Master’s DNP or BSN to DNP-FNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7040 - Systems Approach and QI

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course focuses on the DNP student critically appraising the evidence of quality improvement (QI) measures, strategies, and outcomes in health care systems. The DNP student designs and evaluates care delivery approaches within the current organizational, political, cultural, and economic context to ensure accountability for quality of health care and patient safety in diverse organizations.
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be admitted to the DNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7050 - Advanced Population Health

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course synthesizes concepts related to clinical prevention and at-risk populations. Using epidemiological and informatics principles, the DNP student assesses select population needs, with consideration of psychosocial, cultural, and ecological factors and their impact on health disparities across healthcare systems. Students evaluate care delivery models for population health services addressing health promotion/disease prevention that are responsive to diverse cultural needs. Upon completion of this course, the student completes 30 DNP practice hours.
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be admitted to the DNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7060 - DNP Leadership

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course examines theories and strategies to enhance the DNP student’s leadership skills. Students are prepared to effectively lead change, facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration, and transform practice to impact quality of health care and outcomes within complex health care systems.
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be admitted to the Post Master’s DNP or BSN to DNP-FNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7070 - Healthcare Policy & Professionalism

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Description: In this course, learners will incorporate principles of professionalism to engage with decision-makers in respectful and meaningful ways. Learners will then examine the policy-making process to identify opportunities that advanced practice nurses can employ to influence the development of strong healthcare policies.  Finally, students will use their knowledge to analyze healthcare policies and identify strategies that could be used to advocate for individuals and the profession of nursing to ensure healthcare systems that are safe, equitable, and ethical. Upon completion of this course, the student achieves course practicum hours.
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be admitted to the DNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7080 - Healthcare Finance/Economics

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course focuses on principles of healthcare economics and finance to develop and implement effective planning, decision-making, and evaluation for healthcare delivery within healthcare organizations and systems. It provides a financial management perspective to advanced nursing practice and general health care issues.
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be admitted to the DNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7801 - DNP Project I

    Credits: (1-2)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: The DNP project course produce a tangible and deliverable academic product created from a practice immersion experience, which is reviewed and evaluated by an academic committee. The final product shows evidence of the student’s competence in critical thinking by translating evidence into practice and evaluating the evidence in the practice environment aimed toward improving healthcare outcomes. This course is the first of six courses (NRSG 7801 to NRSG 7806 ) and reflects a synthesis of the student’s growth in knowledge and expertise throughout the program. NRSG 7801 focuses on the background and significance of the problem and outlines the synthesized evidence. This course may contain 30 to 120 DNP practicum hours.
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be admitted to the DNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7802 - DNP Project II

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Description: The DNP project courses produce a tangible and deliverable academic product created from a practice immersion experience, which is reviewed and evaluated by an academic committee. The final product shows evidence of the student’s competence in critical thinking by translating evidence into practice and evaluating the evidence in the practice environment aimed toward improving healthcare outcomes. This course is the second of six courses (NRSG 7801  to NRSG 7806 ) and reflects a synthesis of the student’s growth in knowledge and expertise throughout the program. NRSG 7802 focuses on creating implementation and evaluation plans, presenting project proposals, and obtaining academic committee and IRB approval. This course may contain 30 to 120 DNP practicum hours.
    Pre-requisite(s): Students must be admitted to the DNP program and have successfully completed NRSG 7801 
  
  • NRSG 7803 - DNP Project III

    Credits: (1-2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: The DNP project courses produce a tangible and deliverable academic product created from a practice immersion experience, which is reviewed and evaluated by an academic committee. The final product shows evidence of the student’s competence in critical thinking by translating evidence into practice and evaluating the evidence in the practice environment aimed toward improving healthcare outcomes. This course is the third of six courses (NRSG 7801  to NRSG 7806 ) and reflects a synthesis of the student’s growth in knowledge and expertise throughout the program. NRSG 7803 focuses on the project plan for implementation evaluation, and data analysis. This course may contain 60 practicum hours (1 credit = 60 practicum hours).
    Pre-requisite(s): Student must be admitted to the DNP program.
  
  • NRSG 7804 - DNP Project IV

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: The DNP project courses produce a tangible and deliverable academic product created from a practice immersion experience, which is reviewed and evaluated by an academic committee. The final product shows evidence of the student’s competence in critical thinking by translating evidence into practice and evaluating the evidence in the practice environment aimed toward improving healthcare outcomes. This course is the fourth of six courses (NRSG 7801  to NRSG 7806 ) and reflects a synthesis of the student’s growth in knowledge and expertise throughout the program. NRSG 7804 focuses on the implementation of the project. This course may contain 30 to 120 DNP practicum hours
  
  • NRSG 7805 - DNP Project V

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Description: The DNP project courses produce a tangible and deliverable academic product created from a practice immersion experience, which is reviewed and evaluated by an academic committee. The final product shows evidence of the student’s competence in critical thinking by translating evidence into practice and evaluating the evidence in the practice environment aimed toward improving healthcare outcomes. This course is the fifth of five courses (NRSG 7801 to NRSG 7805) and reflects a synthesis of the student’s growth in knowledge and expertise throughout the program. NRSG 7805 focuses on project results, discussion, conclusions, recommendations, project evaluation, and dissemination. Project practicum hours follow a 1:4 credit-to-clock hours ratio, which is variable per project course, at 0.5-1 credit-to-clock hours. For example, a 1 credit hour project course offers 0.5 credit-to-clock hours (1:4) for 30 practicum hours. A 2-credit hour project course offers 1 credit-to-clock hour (1:4) for 60 practicum hours. The combined practicum hours within the project courses total 240-project practicum hours.

     
    Pre-requisite(s): NRSG 7801  and NRSG 7802  and NRSG 7803  and NRSG 7804 .

  
  • NRSG 7806 - DNP Project VI

    Credits: (1-2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem - Online
    Description: The DNP project courses produce a tangible and deliverable academic product created from a practice immersion experience, which is reviewed and evaluated by an academic committee. The final product shows evidence of the student’s competence in critical thinking by translating evidence into practice and evaluating the evidence in the practice environment aimed toward improving healthcare outcomes. This course is an extension course for those students who do not complete their projects or who do not complete their required DNP Practicum hours in the allotted program of study. This course reflects a synthesis of the student’s growth in knowledge and expertise throughout the program. NRSG 7806 focuses on project completion and practicum hours completion. Project practicum hours follow a 1:4 credit-to-clock hours ratio, which is variable per project course, at 0.5-1 credit-to-clock hours. For example, a 1 credit hour project course offers 0.5 credit-to-clock hours (1:4) for 30 practicum hours. A 2-credit hour project course offers 1 credit-to-clock hour (1:4) for 60 practicum hours. The combined practicum hours within the project courses total 240-project practicum hours.
    Pre-requisite(s): NRSG 7801  and NRSG 7802  and NRSG 7803  and NRSG 7804  and NRSG 7805  must be completed with a B- or higher and requires program director approval. 
  
  • NRSG 7900 INT - DNP Practicum

    Credits: (1-2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This practicum is for DNP nursing students to build on concepts and skills derived from DNP courses and focuses on developing advanced skills in integration and synthesis of practice and knowledge. 
    Pre-requisite(s): Students must be admitted to the DNP program.
    May be repeated up for a maximum of 8 credit hours.
  
  • NRSG 7902 - FNP Clinical I

    Credits: (4)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course is designed to prepare the nurse practitioner student to deliver high quality primary care to patients of all ages, under the direction of a clinical preceptor.  Students will enter the clinical setting and apply evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning principles to both diagnosing and treatment of patients across the lifespan. This course will also improve the student’s ability to collect patient histories, perform physical examination, order and analyze diagnostic tests, determine differential diagnoses, plan intervention, prescribe medication, and document patient encounters.  Emphasis is place on the student leaning to apply health promotion principals in order to prevent disease and mange individualized patient healthcare outcomes.
  
  • NRSG 7903 - FNP Clinical II

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course is designed to prepare the nurse practitioner student to deliver high-quality primary care to patients of all ages, under the direction of a clinical preceptor.  Students will enter the clinical setting and apply evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning principles to both diagnosing and treatment of patients across the lifespan. This course will also improve the student’s ability to collect patient histories, perform physical examinations, order and analyze diagnostic tests, determine differential diagnoses, plan intervention, prescribe medication, and document patient encounters.  Emphasis is placed on the student learning to apply health promotion principles in order to prevent disease and manage individualized patient healthcare outcomes.
  
  • NRSG 7904 INT - FNP Clinical Immersion

    Credits: (4)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course is designed to prepare the nurse practitioner student to deliver high-quality primary care to patients of all ages, under the direction of a clinical preceptor.  Students will enter the clinical setting and apply evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning principles to both diagnosing and treatment of patients across the lifespan. This course will also improve the student’s ability to collect patient histories, perform physical examinations, order and analyze diagnostic tests, determine differential diagnoses, plan intervention, prescribe medication, and document patient encounters.  Emphasis is placed on the student learning to apply health promotion principles in order to prevent disease and manage individualized patient healthcare outcomes.
  
  • NUCM 4103 - Radiopharmaceuticals and Dosages

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Radiopharmacology, characterization of radiopharmaceuticals used in performing examinations and calculation of dosages.
  
  • NUCM 4203 - Scanning and Imaging Procedures I

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Organ concentration, excretion and absorption, measurements and imaging.
  
  • NUCM 4213 - Scanning and Imaging Procedures II

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Organ concentration, excretion and absorption, measurements and imaging.
  
  • NUCM 4223 - Nuclear Cardiology

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Pathology, indications for examination and procedures in nuclear cardiology.
  
  • NUCM 4303 - Radionuclide Physics & Instrumentation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Production and properties of radionuclides, decay schemes, radiation measurements and special characteristics of radiopharmaceuticals.
  
  • NUCM 4333 SI - Quality Assurance

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Nuclear Medicine departmental policies and procedures.
  
  • NUCM 4861 INT - Clinical Education

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A minimum of 24 hours per week in an active Nuclear Medicine department.
  
  • NUCM 4862 INT - Clinical Education

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A minimum of 24 hours per week in an active Nuclear Medicine department.
  
  • NUCM 4863 INT - Clinical Education

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A minimum of 24 hours per week in an active Nuclear Medicine department.
  
  • NUCM 4912 - Comprehensive Review

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Review of learned material.
  
  • NUCM 4991 - Seminar

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: New technology, procedures and equipment.
  
  • NUTR 1020 LS SUS - Science and Application of Human Nutrition

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem, 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, Online
    Course Fee: $15.00
    Course Fee Purpose: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements. The course fee expenditure for this specific course covers the health assessment and body composition measurements in the Nutrition Biochemistry lab.
    Description: Human nutrition is the platform to study the nature and integration of science across disciplines and in society through applied problem solving and data analysis. Nutritional balance and good health are explored in context of the levels of organization, metabolism and homeostasis, genetics and evolution, and ecological interactions.
    Note: This course is taught Web enhanced.
  
  • NUTR 1120 - Nutrition for the Athlete

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $8.00
    Course Fee Purpose: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements. The course fee expenditure for this specific course covers the purchase of expendable food and food service items and acquisition and replacement of nonexpendable kitchen items.
    Description: The course will address nutrition, eating behavior, and lifestyle issues of the athlete in the typical collegiate athletic environment.  Topics in nutrition for the performance athlete, meal planning for the collegiate athlete, menu evaluation, personal diet analysis, and common fad diets aimed at the performance athlete are included.
  
  • NUTR 1240 SUS - Nutrition and Sustainable Cooking

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $45.00
    Course Fee Purpose: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements. The course fee expenditure for this specific course covers the purchase of expendable food and food service items and acquisition and replacement of nonexpendable kitchen items.
    Description: Sustainable ways to acquire, prepare and consume food to support a healthier individual, population, and environment are explored. Food science principles will be emphasized in the laboratory experience.
  
  • NUTR 2020 - Nutrition in the Life Cycle

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Description: This course examines the nutritional needs of humans along with food and nutrition education and programs through the life cycle stages from pre-conception through older adulthood. Students assess normal nutrition and various conditions and interventions across the lifespan through applied case studies.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020 .
  
  • NUTR 2220 - Prenatal and Infant Nutrition

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 1st Blk or 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, or Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, or Online
    Description: This course focuses on nutrition and diet as they apply to birth outcome, the maintenance of maternal health, and the growth of the infant. Breastfeeding and community programs will be discussed in support of maternal and infant health.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020 .
  
  • NUTR 2320 - Food Values, Diet Design and Health

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 1st Blk or 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Online, 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, or Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Online, 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, or Online
    Course Fee: $10.00
    Course Fee Purpose: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements. The course fee expenditure for this specific course covers the use of the InBody 770 scanner to determine basal metabolic rate.
    Description: The relationships between dietary components and the development of chronic diseases provides the foundation for designing diets that support life-long “good health”. Topics in nutrigenomics, food allergy and food technology are introduced.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020 .
    This course is taught Web enhanced.
  
  • NUTR 2420 - Childhood and Adolescent Nutrition

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 1st Blk or 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, or Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, or Online
    Description: The effects of nutrition and diet on child growth, health and behavior are explored from toddler through adolescence. The processes of growth and puberty provide the foundations for understanding nutritional support. Common nutritionally-related problems such as obesity, anemia, and eating disorders are also addressed.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020 .
  
  • NUTR 3020 - Sports Nutrition

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, 1st Blk, 2nd Blk, Hybrid, Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, 1st Blk, 2nd Blk, Hybrid, Online
    Description: The nutritional support necessary to achieve optimum athletic performance will be discussed in the context of diet and metabolism. In addition, the use of ergogenic aids will be addressed with reference to athletic performance.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020  and NUTR 2320 .
    May be repeated up to two times.
  
  • NUTR 3040 - Nutrition Assessment

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Course Fee: $30.00
    Course Fee Purpose: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements. The course fee expenditure for this specific course covers the purchase of consumable lab reagent items and acquisition and replacement of non-consumable Nutrition Biochemistry laboratory equipment.
    Description:

     

     

     

    This course covers foundational assessment methods used to determine population and individual nutritional status. Students will learn the scientific foundation on nutrition assessment and how to apply this knowledge in medical, community and research settings.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  and NUTR 2320 .

  
  • NUTR 3070 - Advanced Food Science

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Course Fee: $45.00
    Course Fee Purpose: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements. The course fee expenditure for this specific course covers the purchase of expendable food and food service items and acquisition and replacement of nonexpendable kitchen items.
    Description: The advanced study of the physical, biological, and chemical make-up of food. Effects of food preparation, storage and processing on nutrient content, taste and shelf-life.
    Pre-requisite(s): (CHEM 1110  or CHEM 1210 ) and NUTR 1020 .
  
  • NUTR 3220 - Foundations in Diet Therapy

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 1st Blk Online, 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Description: The nutrition care process, practice and methods of nutrition support are studied for the management of nutritionally-related medical conditions by body system in which diet is crucial for control of the disease or condition.
    Pre-requisite(s): (NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020 ) and NUTR 2320 .
    Suggested Requisite(s): ZOOL 2200  or HTHS 1110 /HTHS 1111  are recommended.
  
  • NUTR 3320 - Health and Nutrition in the Older Adult

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 2nd Blk or 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Online
    Description: The developmental process of late adulthood with focus on the physiological age-related changes provides the foundation for understanding physical, mental, and social health and well-being in the older adult. Nutrition and exercise assessments and prescriptions, clinical services, community and social support services, complementary and alternative medicine, and other topics are explored in the context of promoting healthy aging.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020 .
  
  • NUTR 3420 - Multicultural Health & Nutrition

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 3rd Blk or 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $5.00
    Course Fee Purpose: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements. The course fee expenditure for this specific course covers the purchase of expendable food and food service items and acquisition and replacement of nonexpendable kitchen items.
    Description: The application and understanding of social, religious, economic and aesthetic qualities of foods provides the knowledge for the explorations of the food patterns of various cultures. The understanding or world food problems as they pertain to the health will also be discussed.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020  and NUTR 2320 .
    This course is taught Web enhanced.
  
  • NUTR 4320 - Current Issues in Nutrition

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Online, 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, or Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Online, 1st Blk, 2nd Blk Hybrid, or Online
    Description: Technology-aided literature review of the nutritional and medical sciences provides the information for presentation to peers in both written and oral forms.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020  and NUTR 2320  or consent of instructor.
  
  • NUTR 4420 - Nutrition and Fitness

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: 1st Blk or 2nd Blk Hybrid
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: 1st Blk or 2nd Blk Online
    Course Fee: $50.00
    Course Fee Purpose: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements. The course fee expenditure for this specific course covers the use of various body composition analyses as well as the acquisition, replacement, and maintenance of such equipment.
    Description: Principles of sports nutrition and fitness are applied to achieve a healthy body weight. Consideration of exercise and dietary practices along with fitness evaluation, dietary analysis and body composition testing are utilized to create a plan to improve physiological health.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020  and NUTR 2320 .
    This course is taught Web enhanced.
  
  • NUTR 4440 - Advanced Human Nutrition

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Description: The advanced study of human nutrition with focus on the metabolism of vitamins, minerals, and energy-producing nutrients. The structure, properties, and functions of the nutrients and their regulatory roles in metabolism, body composition and weight, fluid balance, health, and disease states are covered with clinical examples and across the lifespan.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  and NUTR 2320 .
    Co-Requisite(s): CHEM 3070 .
  
  • NUTR 4520 CRE - Directed Undergraduate Nutrition Research

    Credits: (1-4)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course will provide undergraduate students an opportunity to engage in research processes and participate in ongoing nutrition research projects.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 4320  or NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020  and Permission of Instructor.
    May be repeated 3 times up to 6 credit hours.
  
  • NUTR 4830 CRE - Directed Readings

    Credits: (1-3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem Online, 1st Blk Online or 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem Online, 1st Blk Online or 2nd Blk Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem Online, 1st Blk Online or 2nd Blk Online
    Description: Independent and directed readings or secondary research on advanced special topics under the direction of a faculty mentor.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 2320  and consent of faculty supervisor prior to registration.
    May be repeated for up to 3 credit hours.
  
  • NUTR 4860 INT - Field Experience

    Credits: (1-2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Work experience, which applies prior academic learning in a supervised setting. 
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1240  and consent of faculty supervisor prior to registration. 
    May be repeated up to 2 credit hours.
  
  • NUTR 4990 - Senior Seminar

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem Online
    Description: This is a capstone course for Nutrition seniors only. The experiences in the Nutrition major will be summarized and students will be prepared for graduate study or future employment.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 3420 .
  
  • NUTR 6320 - Current Issues in Nutrition

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Technology-aided literature review of the nutritional and medical sciences provides the information for presentation to peers in both written and oral forms.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020  and NUTR 2320  or consent of instructor.
  
  • NUTR 6420 - Nutrition and Fitness

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: 1st Blk or 2nd Blk Hybrid
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: 1st Blk or 2nd Blk Online
    Course Fee: $0.00
    Description: Principles of sports nutrition and fitness are applied to achieve a healthy body weight. Consideration of exercise and dietary practices along with fitness evaluation, dietary analysis and body composition testing are utilized to create a plan to improve physiological health.
    Pre-requisite(s): Consent of instructor.
    This course is taught Web enhanced.
  
  • NUTR 6520 - Directed Graduate Nutrition Research

    Credits: (1-4)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course will provide graduate students an opportunity to engage in research processes and participate in ongoing nutrition research projects.
    Pre-requisite(s): NUTR 4320  or NUTR 1020  or HLTH 1020  and Permission of Instructor. Graduate students taking this class as 6520 must have completed a statistical methods course.
    May be repeated 3 times up to 4 credit hours.
  
  • OCRE 2300 - Wilderness First Responder (WFR)

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $230.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Syllabus Statement in Regard to Course Fees

    Course Fee: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, or to meet specific regulatory requirements and best practices. The course fees in this course will be used to support nationally recognized certification for students in both wilderness first responder (WFR) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Each student is individually tested and assessed for proficiency to earn the wilderness first responder certification. All students are tested as part of this course. The typical fee range for WFR courses is between $700 and $800. Courses are typically 8-10 days in duration, and fees often do not include lodging or meals.
    Description: Wilderness First Responder (WFR) is an industry-standard, internationally recognized 72-80 hour (per provider) certification course focused on emergency response for remote settings in the backcountry. The course is designed for professionals who intend to work in a position of leadership in an outdoor setting, or for individuals who want a high level of wilderness medical training for extended personal backcountry trips or expeditions. Participants will learn systems for patient assessment, extended care (including CPR), and rescue/evacuation in remote settings. Emphasis will be placed on the acquisition and application of knowledge and skills necessary for responsible practice in the field of outdoor recreation. Upon successful completion of the course (including a written and practical exam), students will earn an internationally recognized professional certification.
  
  • OCRE 2500 - Introduction to Outdoor Pursuits

    Credits: (4)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $200.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course Fee: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements and best practices.
    Description: Introduction to Outdoor Pursuits is focused on engaging and introducing students to discover, explore, and practice a variety of outdoor adventure and recreation activities.  This includes, but is not limited to, group development, outdoor living, backpacking, flat- and whitewater paddling, mountain biking, rock climbing, caving, and winter-based pursuits.  Emphasis is placed on activity-specific technical skill development, equipment management, risk management, environmental ethics, and basic instructional and facilitation strategies.  Field Sessions are required.
  
  • OCRE 2550 - Leadership and Safety Management for Outdoor Pursuits

    Credits: (4)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 2nd Blk
    Course Fee: $225.00
    Course Fee Purpose: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements. Examples of course fee expenditures for this course include food, safety equipment, first aid supplies, and other incidentals, and licensing fees.
    Description: This course introduces students to many of the skills needed to be a safe and effective outdoor leader. The course is intended for individuals wishing to pursue employment as outdoor leaders in various outdoor adventure activities. Topics will include trip preparation, planning, logistics, planning for and managing risks in outdoor pursuits, group dynamics, leadership styles, emergency response, and environmental considerations. The majority of class time will be spent in the field as part of a multi-day expedition.
    Pre-requisite(s): OCRE 2500 .
    Suggested Requisite(s): OCRE 2300 , GEOG 1002 .
  
  • OCRE 2610 - Introduction to Outdoor Living Skills I

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $45.00
    Course Fee Purpose: The course fees in this course will be used to support learning experiences in the field, including a multi-day/night backcountry trip. Associated course fees will provide for equipment, travel and permits/entrance fees.
    Description: This course will provide students with an overview of backcountry skills.  Students will learn about backcountry travel and camping skills, equipment use, and hazard identification.  One lecture and 3 hour field trip are required each week.
  
  • OCRE 2810 - Experimental Course

    Credits: (1-6)
    Experimental
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • OCRE 2860 - Outdoor Leadership Practicum

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: The purpose of Outdoor Leadership Practicum is to provide students with the opportunity to apply the requisite knowledge and skills to organize and lead outdoor activities. Under the supervision of OCRE faculty, students will gain experience designing and leading outdoor activities in a volunteer or work setting for a minimum of 40 supervised hours. Emphasis will be placed on client/participant assessment, curriculum design and delivery, safety, and environmental impact. Approval for practicum experiences is coordinated and assigned by OCRE faculty.
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: OCRE 2300 , 2500 , 4 credits of REC courses or permission of the instructor.
    This course may be repeated for up to 4 credit hours.
  
  • OCRE 2890 INT - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (1-9)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Provides academic credit for on-the-job experience. Grade and amount of credit will be determined by the department. Open to all students in Recreation who meet the minimum Cooperative Work Experience requirements of the department.
    May be repeated 8 times up to 9 credit hours.
  
  • OCRE 3050 - Recreation and Leisure in Society

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Content, nature, extent and significance of recreation and leisure; their role in our lives, relevant service delivery agencies/organizations/businesses, leadership functions and styles, and an introduction to team-building/adventure programming activities.
  
  • OCRE 3100 - Recreation Leadership and Group Facilitation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $10.00
    Course Fee Purpose: The course fees in this course will be used to purchase resources and materials to support the facilitation of group development activities on an individual and small-group level.
    Description: Customer/client-based leisure services, role delineation, settings, theories of leadership and group dynamics. Skills: apply various experiential techniques for different populations that recreational professionals may encounter.
  
  • OCRE 3230 - Wilderness Nutrition & Backcountry Cooking

    Credits: (4)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: 1st Blk
    Course Fee: $141.00
    Course Fee Purpose: The course fees in this course will be used to purchase resources and materials to support lab equipment and field experiences
    Description: For outdoor professionals and those who spend extensive time in the outdoors, wilderness nutrition and backcountry cooking are critical components to providing safe, healthy, and enjoyable outdoor recreation experiences. Concepts of nutritional balance, energy needs, menu planning, and cooking are explored and applied within the context of a backcountry setting.  Multiple field experiences are required.
    Pre-requisite(s): HLTH 1030  or NUTR 1020 .
  
  • OCRE 3300 - Inclusive and Adaptive Recreation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Students will explore and apply concepts of leisure and recreation experiences and the related social impacts across a wide variety of populations including: ethnicity, race, ability, gender, age, religion and nationality.
  
  • OCRE 3320 - Adventure Programming

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: In this course, students will gain a theoretical and applied understanding of adventure programming within the field of Community and Outdoor Recreation. Students will have the opportunity to explore program planning and preparation, and activity implementation through individual and collaborative learning experiences. Upon completion of this course, students will have a Program Plan that reflects the theoretical and logistical elements that comprise programs in Community and Outdoor Recreation. This course also requires an adventure program implementation field experience.
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: OCRE 3100  (formerly REC 3810).
  
  • OCRE 3400 - Outdoor Equipment Production and Retailing

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Students will learn about key outdoor gear manufacturers, materials used in equipment, and practices retail operation use in the sales of outdoor apparel and equipment. Students will apply course information to analyze, critique, and create an outdoor gear concept. In class exercises, site visits, field trips, and assignments will challenge students to engage in critical thinking and complex quantitative and communication skills.
    Pre-requisite(s): OCRE 2500  or permission from the instructor.
  
  • OCRE 3450 - Adventure Travel and Sustainable Tourism

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $75.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Course Fee: This course has a fee attached. Course fees are established in order to benefit the students in this course and may, among other things, be used to cover the costs of equipment replacement and maintenance, consumable materials, licensure examinations, or to meet specific regulatory requirements and best practices.
    Description: This course will provide an overview of history, development, organization, impacts and trends within adventure travel and tourism industries. Students will learn about development and evolution of adventure travel and sustainable tourism; socio-cultural, economic, and environmental dimensions within adventure travel and sustainable tourism; positive and negative impacts of tourism; and principles and practices conducive to sustainable tourism. Students will gain experience in critically analyzing and evaluating adventure travel and sustainable tourism industries.
  
  • OCRE 3500 - Community Recreation and Park Planning

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course will focus on principles and methods of recreation and park design and planning. The student should expect to learn how to: assess community recreation facilities, parks, open spaces, recreation trends, industry standards, create planning goals and objectives, and make planning recommendations. Classification of recreation areas according to primary function, location and clientele will also be explored.
    Pre-requisite(s): OCRE 3320 .
  
  • OCRE 3520 - Risk Management and Legal Issues in Recreation Services

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $15.00
    Course Fee Purpose: The course fees in this course will be used to purchase access to resources that will support learning outcomes, specifically actual legal cases to be reviewed and analyzed.
    Description: Risk Management and Legal Issues is focused on the examination of general legal concepts, federal and state legislation, and legal liabilities as these relate to and impact programming with the fields of community and outdoor recreation.  Emphasis is placed on the process of identifying and managing potential risks in recreation, education, developmental, and social service settings, as well as organizational structures.  The course content is interdisciplinary in nature, and is grounded in the tenets of experiential education.
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: OCRE 3320 .
  
  • OCRE 3600 - Administration and Management of Outdoor and Community Recreations Services

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course provides an examination of administration and management skills tied to outdoor recreation agencies/businesses/organizations. Emphasis will be placed on site visits, services delivery, environmental impacts, legal issues, human resources and administration and management skills. Outdoor activities (backpacking/hiking/camping/ropes course leadership, and use of technology in leisure research and programming) will be explored in the context of program management and administration. Field trips are required.
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: OCRE 3320 .
  
  • OCRE 3700 - Recreation and Sports Facilities and Events Management

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: The course fees in this course will be used for two primary purposes. The first is for entrance fees during site visits to local recreation and sport facilities. The second is to purchase access to resources that will support learning outcomes, specifically published articles related to facility design and operations, which will be reviewed and analyzed.
    Description: Studies the principles, guidelines, and fundamental practices involved in indoor and outdoor facilities planning, construction, use and management, as well as publicity and management of events for recreation and sports. Integrates tenets of the law and risk management as they relate to recreational and athletic facilities and events.
    Pre-requisite(s): ESS 2200  or OCRE 3050 .
  
  • OCRE 3900 - Commercial Outdoor Recreation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course will cover outdoor and adventure recreation business development. Particular emphasis will be on analyzing the types of commercial and private recreation enterprises, trends and directions, regulations, financial requirements and procedures for planning and organizing commercial recreation services.
    Pre-requisite(s): OCRE 3320 .
  
  • OCRE 4000 - Recreation Programming for Youth Development

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course will review and apply theories of youth development to recreation-based settings. Topics addressed include: youth development theories, political, social, and cultural issues relevant to youth development, types of youth serving organizations, youth professional roles and responsibilities; quality youth programming, logic modeling, program evaluation, and theory-driven program design.
    Pre-requisite(s): OCRE 3100  or permission from the instructor.
  
  • OCRE 4020 - Nature Interpretation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $50.00
    Course Fee Purpose: The course fees in this course will be used to support authentic learning experiences in the field, including an overnight trip. Associated course fees will provide for equipment, travel and permits/entrance fees.
    Description: Nature Interpretation is focused on providing the student with an in-depth investigation of the fundamental principles and concepts of nature interpretation.  This includes, but is not limited to historical development of the field, principles of exhibit design, interpretative program designs and techniques, common field techniques, and current trends used by outdoor leaders.  In addition, an overview of employment opportunities in the field will be explored.  This course emphasizes experimental learning theories and their application to natural history interpretation and environmental education program design.  The course content is interdisciplinary in nature, and is grounded in the tenets of experiential education and learning (per the work of John Dewey).
    Pre-requisite(s): OCRE 3050  and OCRE 3100  (formerly 3810).
  
  • OCRE 4300 - Trends and Ethical Issues in Recreation Services

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Current Trends and Ethical Issues in Recreation examines major ethical theories and their relation to the development of personal and professional ethics in practitioners working in the field of community and outdoor recreation.  The differences between ethics and morality will be analyzed, and selected codes of ethics will be presented for review and discussion.  The application of ethical decision making and problem solving in recreation settings will be explored.
    Pre-requisite(s): OCRE 3600 .
  
  • OCRE 4500 - Grant and Proposal Writing for Recreation Professionals

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Grant and Proposal Writing for Recreation Professionals is focused on providing the student with an in-depth investigation of grant writing and management.  The course will provide students with an opportunity for primary and authentic experience in researching and writing grants.  Students will explore the process of identifying prospective funders, developing relationships with funders, comprehending the basics of writing grants, submitting proposals, working in collaborative partnerships, and preparing for follow up and evaluation.  Students will apply course learning to write and prepare actual grant proposals.  The course content is interdisciplinary in nature, and is grounded in the tenets of experiential education and learning.
    Pre-requisite(s): OCRE 3050  or permission from the instructor.
  
  • OCRE 4550 - Outdoor Education Philosophies & Principles

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $52.00
    Course Fee Purpose: The course fees in this course will be used to support field experiences in the field. Associated course fees will provide for equipment, travel and permits/entrance fees.
    Description: Provides basic concepts of outdoor education, and direct, firsthand experience with learning resources beyond the classroom.
    Pre-requisite(s): OCRE 2500 .
  
  • OCRE 4800 - Individual Projects

    Credits: (1-3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A comprehensive study of a significant problem in the field of recreation. Hours to be arranged. For seniors only.
    May be repeated 2 times up to 3 credit hours.
  
  • OCRE 4890 INT - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (1-6)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A continuation of OCRE 2890 .
    May be repeated 5 times up to 6 credit hours.
  
  • OCRE 4930 - Outdoor Education Workshop

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $40.00
    Course Fee Purpose: The course fees in this course will be used to cover equipment rental to support activities taking place in field-based settings. Associated course fees will cover the use of 3-4 different types of outdoor equipment used for 3-4 different day trips.
    Description: A broad inter-disciplinary approach to the methodology of outdoor education teaching techniques; experiential learning-course taught almost totally outdoors.
  
  • OCRE 6930 - Outdoor Education Workshop

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $40.00
    Course Fee Purpose: The course fees in this course will be used to cover equipment rental to support activities taking place in field-based settings. Associated course fees will cover the use of 3-4 different types of outdoor equipment used for 3-4 different day trips.
    Description: A broad interdisciplinary approach to the methodology of outdoor education teaching techniques; experiential learning-course taught almost totally outdoors.
  
  • PAR 1000 INT - Emergency Medical Technician

    Credits: (4)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 1st Blk
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course teaches the student to recognize and instruct the response to emergency calls to provide efficient and immediate care to the critically ill and injured, and deliver transport needs for the patient to the appropriate medical facility. The student will be able to determine the nature and extent of illness or injury and establish priority for required emergency care. Theory will include the emergency medical care to the adult, infant and child, medical, and trauma patients. This course meets all of the requirements of the National EMS Education Standards. Successful evaluation of professionalism, interpersonal relationships, skills, and knowledge must be completed for recommendation of certification. (Must be taken with PAR 1001 .)
    May be repeated up to 99 times.
  
  • PAR 1001 - Emergency Medical Technician Lab

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 1st Blk
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, 2nd Blk
    Description: At the completion of this course the student will be able to demonstrate competency managing emergencies, utilizing all Basic Support equipment and skills in accordance with all behavioral objectives in the current National EMS Education Standards. In addition to the lab, this course requires that the student have patient interactions in a clinical setting. Based on assessment finding, renders emergency medical care to the adult, infant and child, medical, and trauma patients. Successful evaluation of professionalism, interpersonal relationships, skills, and knowledge must be completed for recommendation of certification. (Must be taken with PAR 1000 ).
  
  • PAR 1005 INT - EMT-Basic Field Experience - I

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Minimum of 120 hours of supervised EMT-Basic patient care experience provided through assigned day shifts on the ambulance and/or pre-hospital setting. A preceptor evaluates basic life support knowledge, skills and affective abilities.
    Pre-requisite(s): PAR 1000 /PAR 1001  and HTHS 1101 , HTHS 1110 /HTHS 1111  and 70% minimum on EMT-B assessment exam. Department permission required.
  
  • PAR 1006 INT - EMT-Basic Field Experience - II

    Credits: (3)
    Description: Minimum of 120 additional hours of continued supervised EMT-Basic patient care experience provided through assigned shifts on the ambulance and/or pre-hospital setting. A preceptor evaluates basic life support knowledge, skills and affective abilities.
    Pre-requisite(s): PAR 1005 , ENGL 1010 , and MATH 0990  or MATH 1010 .
    Note: This course is not currently being offered.
  
  • PAR 1010 - Emergency Medical Technician - Intermediate Introduction

    Credits: (2)
    Description: Introduction of Intermediate EMT concepts of basic and advanced life support utilizing cognitive knowledge objects using the State Department of Health and current National Standard EMT-I Curriculum. Application of pre-hospital care will be demonstrated through written assignments and exams. Course may be challenged for credit. Course is required, or equivalent work experience, before admission into the paramedic program.
    Pre-requisite(s): Must have Basic EMT certification.
    May be repeated up to 99 times.
    Note: PAR 1010 combined with PAR 1011  will provide a certificate of 60 hours of continuing medical education hours toward recertification requirements for the Utah State Department of Health. This course is not currently being offered.
  
  • PAR 1011 - Emergency Medical Technician - Intermediate Introduction Lab

    Credits: (2)
    Description: This course requires clinical hours with an emergency facility and ambulance as scheduled. Application of basic EMT skills involving pre-hospital care with staged and real emergencies and demonstration of psychomotor skills through laboratory, ambulance riding time, and clinical assignments. Clinical activities are adapted to previous documented work experiences. This course may be challenged for credit. This course is required, or equivalent work experience, before admission into the paramedic program.
    Pre-requisite(s): Must have Basic EMT certification.
    Note: PAR 1010  combined with PAR 1011 will provide a certificate of 60 hours of continuing medical education hours toward recertification requirements for the Utah State Department of Health. This course is not currently being offered.
  
  • PAR 1020 - Emergency Medical Technician - Intermediate

    Credits: (2)
    Description: Curriculum includes but is not limited to the US Department of Transportation National Standard Curriculum for the EMT-Intermediate. This course consists of the cognitive knowledge and theory components of the USDOT Curriculum and builds upon the EMT Basic knowledge. State certification eligibility of EMT Intermediate upon successful completion of both PAR 1020 and PAR 1021 . Students will demonstrate mastery of cognitive knowledge skills through written assignments and examinations. Course format consists of didactic lecture. Paramedic Program application, faculty review, and committee selection are required to be admitted to this course.
    Pre-requisite(s): PAR 1011  or equivalent.
    May be repeated up to 99 times.
    Note: This course is not currently being offered.
  
  • PAR 1021 - Emergency Medical Technician - Intermediate Lab

    Credits: (2)
    Description: Curriculum includes but is not limited to the U.S. Department of Transportation National Standard Curriculum for the EMT-Intermediate. Builds upon the EMT Basic psychomotor skills. State certification eligibility of EMT I upon successful completion of both PAR 1020  and PAR 1021. This course consists of clinical instruction and supervised field experiences in an advanced life support rescue unit which functions under a medical command authority. Students will demonstrate their mastery of the educational psychomotor skills through practical exams and staged and real emergencies. Must have department approval by application process involving an admissions committee final selection.
    Pre-requisite(s): PAR 1020  or equivalent.
    Note: This course is not currently being offered.
  
  • PAR 1030 - Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS)

    Credits: (1)
    Description: Subject and case based approach to American Heart Association protocols and skills required for successful resuscitation of child and infant. The cognitive and psychomotor skills needed to resuscitate and stabilize infants and children in respiratory failure, shock, or cardiopulmonary arrest.
    Pre-requisite(s): Basic Life Support course completion card.
    May be repeated up to 99 times.
    Note: This course is not currently being offered.
 

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