May 21, 2024  
2022-23 Catalog 
    
2022-23 Catalog ARCHIVED CATALOG: Content may no longer be accurate.

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • PHIL 3700 - Environmental Philosophy

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An introduction to central issues in the field of environmental philosophy. The course may cover such topics as conceptions of nature; moral frameworks for addressing environmental problems, including theories of social justice; values in nature, both moral and aesthetic; and applied ethical issues, such as the ethics of climate change and animal rights/welfare.
  
  • PHIL 4400 - Great Issues in Philosophy

    Credits: (3)
    Description: A selected study of one of the traditional questions of philosophy, such as the nature of knowledge and truth, the mind/body problem, free will/determinism, and the nature of moral/aesthetic value.
    May be repeated once up to six credits covering a different topic.
    Note: This course is offered as needed.
  
  • PHIL 4450 - Great Thinkers of Philosophy

    Credits: (3)
    Description: Selected study of the major works of a single central figure in philosophy. Philosophers whose works may be taught include, but are not limited to: Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, Mill, and Wittgenstein.
    May be repeated once up to six credits covering a different philosopher.
    Note: This course is offered as needed.
  
  • PHIL 4510 - Metaphysics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: A study of enduring topics concerning the nature of reality, such as the mind/body problem, free will/determinism, the problem of universals, and the existence of God. Historical and contemporary philosophers are discussed.
  
  • PHIL 4520 - Epistemology

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: A study of enduring topics in the theory of knowledge, such as the nature of justification; the relationship between knowledge, justification, and belief; the nature of truth; and sources of knowledge. Historical and contemporary philosophers are discussed.
  
  • PHIL 4530 - Philosophy of Mind

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: A study of enduring topics in the philosophy of mind, such as the nature of mind; the mind-body problem; consciousness; the individuation of mental content; artificial intelligence. Historical and contemporary philosophers are discussed.
  
  • PHIL 4540 - Philosophy of Language

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: A survey of central topics in the philosophy of language, including semantic content, speech acts, and the connection between meaning and truth. Historical and contemporary philosophers are discussed.
  
  • PHIL 4600 - Ethical Theory

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: An in-depth study of western ethical theories, including utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, virtue ethics, and social contract theory.
  
  • PHIL 4810 - Experimental Course

    Credits: (1-6)
    Experimental
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript. 
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
    Note: This course is offered as needed.
  
  • PHIL 4830 - Directed Readings

    Credits: (1-2)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Individually designed tutorial for philosophy minors and majors, intended to satisfy program requirements not available through scheduled class offerings.
    May be repeated 8 times for a maximum of 9 credits.
  
  • PHIL 4900 - Senior Capstone Seminar

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A comprehensive review of the various areas of philosophy and an in-depth study of a single philosopher with the goal of producing a substantial thesis paper.
  
  • PHIL 4920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and number of credits authorized will appear on the student’s transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
    Note: This course is offered as needed.
  
  • PHYS 1010 PS - Elementary Physics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Course Fee: $10.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Consumables and maintenance of equipment used for teaching demonstrations
    Description: A brief survey of physics at the introductory level. Topics covered include laws of motion, gravity, energy, light, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics, radioactivity, and relativity.
    Three hours of lecture per week.
  
  • PHYS 1040 PS - Elementary Astronomy

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem Online
    Course Fee: $10.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Consumables and maintenance of equipment used for teaching demonstrations
    Description: A brief survey of the physical universe using the fundamental laws of physics. Topics include the history of astronomy, the solar system, the sun, the evolution of stars, pulsars, black holes, the Milky Way galaxy, galaxies, quasars, and the Big Bang.
    Three hours of lecture per week.
    Cross-listed with ASTR 1040 .
  
  • PHYS 1360 PS - Principles of Physical Science

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A lecture/laboratory course designed to provide an introduction to the scientific method and its application to the study of selected topics in physics and chemistry.
    Two hours of lecture and one 3-hour lab per week.
    Recommended for Elementary Education majors.
  
  • PHYS 2010 PS - College Physics I

    Credits: (5)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: First semester of a two-semester sequence in general physics, primarily for students in pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, technology and other disciplines requiring physics without calculus. This semester covers topics in mechanics, including kinematics, Newton’s laws, and the conservation laws of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum. Also covered are topics in gravity, fluid mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics.
    Class meets five hours per week in lecture/discussion format. One 3-hour lab per week (PHYS 2019 ).
    Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1060  OR MATH 1080  OR MATH 1210 .
    Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 2019 .
  
  • PHYS 2015 - College Physics I Lab

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Enrollment limited to transfer students.
    One 3-hour lab per week.
    Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 2010 .
    Enrollment limited to transfer students.
  
  • PHYS 2019 - College Physics I Lab

    Credits: (0)
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Laboratory consumables, maintenance of laboratory equipment, hourly employee lab assistance
    Description: 3-hour lab to be taken concurrently with PHYS 2010 .
    Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 2010 .
  
  • PHYS 2020 - College Physics II

    Credits: (5)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Second semester of a two-semester sequence in general physics. This semester covers topics in electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic waves, light and optics, relativity, atomic, and nuclear physics.
    Class meets five hours per week in lecture/discussion format. One 3-hour lab per week (PHYS 2029 ).
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2010 .
    Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 2029 .
  
  • PHYS 2025 - College Physics II Lab

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Enrollment limited to transfer students.
    One 3-hour lab per week.
    Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 2020 .
    Enrollment limited to transfer students.
  
  • PHYS 2029 - College Physics II Lab

    Credits: (0)
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Laboratory consumables, maintenance of laboratory equipment, hourly employee lab assistance
    Description: 3-hour lab to be taken concurrently with PHYS 2020 .
    Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 2020 .
  
  • PHYS 2040 PS - Principles of Observational Astronomy

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An introductory course in observational astronomy. Topics will include planetary, stellar, and galactic astronomy, with a focus on modern observational techniques, including digital imagery, spectroscopy, and observing with science-grade astronomical instrumentation. Cross-listed with ASTR 2040.
    Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1060  (minimum grade of C).
  
  • PHYS 2090 PS SUS - Energy and the Environment

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This interdisciplinary course explores how energy moves through our modern technological society. We will study the many forms of energy, traditional, and emerging sources of energy, and how energy use affects our environment. Much of the course will focus on identifying energy-related problems and their potential solutions.
  
  • PHYS 2210 PS - Physics for Scientists and Engineers I

    Credits: (5)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: First semester of a two-semester sequence in calculus-based physics, primarily for students in science, math, computer science, and pre engineering. This semester covers topics in mechanics, including kinematics, Newton’s laws, and the conservation laws of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum. Also covered are topics in gravity, fluid mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics.
    Class meets five hours per week in lecture/discussion format. One 3-hour lab per week (PHYS 2219 ).
    Co-Requisite(s): MATH 1210  and PHYS 2219 .
  
  • PHYS 2215 - Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Lab

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Enrollment limited to transfer students.
    One 3-hour lab per week.
    Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 2210 .
    Enrollment limited to transfer students.
  
  • PHYS 2219 - Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Lab

    Credits: (0)
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Laboratory consumables, maintenance of laboratory equipment, hourly employee lab assistance
    Description: 3-hour lab to be taken concurrently with PHYS 2210 .
    Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 2210 .
  
  • PHYS 2220 - Physics for Scientists and Engineers II

    Credits: (5)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Second semester of a two semester sequence in calculus-based physics. This semester covers topics in electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic waves, light and optics, relativity, and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics.
    Class meets five hours per week in lecture/discussion format. One 3-hour lab per week (PHYS 2229).
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2210 .
    Co-Requisite(s): MATH 1220 .
  
  • PHYS 2225 - Physics for Scientists and Engineers II Lab

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Enrollment limited to transfer students.
    One 3-hour lab per week.
    Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 2220 .
    Enrollment limited to transfer students.
  
  • PHYS 2229 - Physics for Scientists and Engineers II Lab

    Credits: (0)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Course Fee: $25.00
    Course Fee Purpose: Laboratory consumables, maintenance of laboratory equipment, hourly employee lab assistance
    Description: One 3-hour lab per week.
    Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 2220 .
  
  • PHYS 2300 - Scientific Computing for Physical Systems

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An introduction to computer programming and fundamental numerical algorithms as used for problem solving and visualization in the natural sciences. Applications may include nonlinear dynamics, chaos, many-particle systems, and Monte Carlo techniques.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2210 , MATH 1210 , and either MATH 1200  or CS 1030  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • PHYS 2600 - Laboratory Safety

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An interdisciplinary, team-taught course that will be an overview of the major chemical, biological and physical safety issues related to science laboratories and field work.
    Class will meet once per week and will be taught in a lecture/demonstration format.
  
  • PHYS 2710 - Introductory Modern Physics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Relativity, quantum effects, the hydrogen atom, many-electron atoms, molecular and solid-state bonding, quantum effect devices, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and devices, elementary particles.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220 , MATH 1200  (may be taken concurrently), and MATH 1220 .
  
  • PHYS 2800 - Introductory Individual Research Problems

    Credits: (1-3)
    Description: Time and credit to be arranged. Intended for students working on a directed research project which includes physics/astronomy at the lower division level for one or more semesters.
    Pre-requisite(s): Consent of instructor.
    Cross-listed with ASTR 2800 .
    May be repeated up to 10 times.
  
  • PHYS 2820 - Elements of Research in the Sciences

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This interdisciplinary course provides concrete skills for productive entry-level scientific research. Students engage in a hands-on introduction to scientific research and methods, including an introduction to sample handling, data analysis, and dissemination of results through papers and presentations. Upon completion of the course, a student will be prepared for potential internships, summer research programs, and research assistantships both on and off campus. 
    Pre-requisite(s): MATH 1060  or MATH 1080  or MATH 1210 ; and CHEM 1210  or PHYS 2210  or PHYS 2010  or (GEO 1110  and GEO 1115 ).
    Cross-listed with CHEM 2820  and GEO 2820 .
  
  • PHYS 2830 - Introductory Readings in Physics/Astronomy

    Credits: (1-3)
    Description: Time and credit to be arranged. Intended for students working on a directed reading project which includes physics/astronomy at the lower division level for one or more semesters.
    Pre-requisite(s): Consent of instructor.
    Cross-listed with ASTR 2830 .
    May be repeated up to 10 times.
  
  • PHYS 2890 INT - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (1-6)
    Description: Open to all students in the Physics Department who meet the minimum Cooperative Work Experience requirements of the department. Provides academic credit for on-the-job experience. Grade and amount of credit will be determined by the department.
  
  • PHYS 2920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • PHYS 3160 - Stellar and Planetary Astrophysics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: Selected topics in astrophysics, with a focus on stellar and planetary systems. Topics may include celestial mechanics, interaction of light and matter, stellar and planetary spectroscopy, stellar atmospheres and interiors, binary star systems, planets and planet formation, and extrasolar planets.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220 .
    Cross-listed with ASTR 3160 .
  
  • PHYS 3170 - Galaxies and Cosmology

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: Selected topics in astrophysics, with a focus on galactic astronomy and cosmology. Topics may include gravitational dynamics, interaction of light and matter, galaxy classification, galaxy formation and evolution, the structure of the universe, cosmology, and the origin and fate of the universe.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220 .
    Cross-listed with ASTR 3170.
  
  • PHYS 3180 - Thermal Physics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An introduction to thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Topics include heat and work; ideal gases; equipartition of energy; entropy; the Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein distributions; applications to heat engines, refrigeration, chemical equilibrium, phase transitions, blackbody radiation, and properties of solids.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220 , MATH 1200  and MATH 1220 .
  
  • PHYS 3190 - Applied Optics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: Geometrical and physical optics, lasers, lenses, optical instruments, interference, thin films, interferometry, holography, diffraction, gratings, crystal diffraction, polarization.
    Two lectures and one 3-hour lab a week.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220  and MATH 1220 .
  
  • PHYS 3300 - Advanced Computational Physics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: This course extends the computational skills developed in PHYS 2300  to address a wider range of problems in modern physics. Students will explore the limits of computational methods and develop techniques suited to high-performance computing. Applications may be chosen from nonlinear dynamics, astrophysics, condensed matter physics, and quantum mechanics.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220  and PHYS 2300 .
  
  • PHYS 3410 - Electronics for Scientists

    Credits: (4)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An introductory course in electronics for students in physics and other sciences. The course includes D.C. and a.c. circuit analysis using complex impedances and covers basic principles of semiconductor operation, transistors, analog and digital integrated circuits, analog-to-digital conversion techniques used in computer interfacing, and noise.
    Three lectures and one 3-hour lab a week.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220 .
  
  • PHYS 3420 - Data Analysis, Statistics, and Instrumentation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: Intermediate-level course in computer interfacing (data acquisition and analysis) for students in physics and all other sciences. Topics may include: data acquisition with industry-standard software packages, computerized test and measurement, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, data acquisition electronics, electronic sensors (thermal sensors, light sensors, etc.), least squares curve fitting, fast Fourier transforms (FFT), Nyquist’s theorem, noisy and weak signals.
    Two lectures and one 3-hour lab a week.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2020  or PHYS 2220 .
  
  • PHYS 3500 - Analytical Mechanics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Particle motion, oscillating systems; planetary motion, stability of orbits; collisions; Euler’s equations, gyroscopic motion; Lagrange’s equations, Hamilton’s equations, theory of vibrations.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220 , MATH 1200  and MATH 2280 .
  
  • PHYS 3510 - Electromagnetic Theory

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Vector analysis; electrostatics; calculating electric potentials; solving Laplace’s equation; multipole expansions; electrostatic fields in matter; magnetostatics; charges in motion; electrodynamics; Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s equations.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220 , MATH 1200 , MATH 2210  and MATH 2280 .
  
  • PHYS 3540 - Mechanical and Electromagnetic Waves

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Periodic motions, free and forced vibrations; resonance; normal modes; dispersion; boundary conditions; electromagnetic waves and light; the Fresnel equations; electromagnetic radiation from accelerating charges.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 3500 , PHYS 3510 .
  
  • PHYS 3570 - Foundations of Science Education

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A thorough investigation of research in science learning and curricular standards at the state and national levels. Foundations of the philosophy of science and scientific inquiry as applicable to science teaching at the secondary level. This course serves as a foundation to a preservice science teacher’s education coursework.
  
  • PHYS 3710 - Nuclear and Particle Physics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: Nuclear structure and nuclear reactions including radioactive decay, fission, and fusion, with selected applications. The standard model of elementary particles and interactions. Collider experiments and their interpretation in terms of Feynman diagrams. Topics of current research at the high-energy frontier.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2710 .
  
  • PHYS 3810 - Experimental Course

    Credits: (1-6)
    Experimental
    Description: Individual courses offered on an experimental basis, identified by specific name and description. The specific title will appear on student’s transcript along with the authorized credit.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • PHYS 4200 - The Physics of Materials

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: An introduction to the modern theory of condensed matter. Emphasis is placed on the structural, electrical, and thermal properties of solids, with particular attention to materials of current research interest.
    Pre-requisite(s):  CHEM 1210  and either PHYS 2710  or CHEM 3410 .
  
  • PHYS 4400 - Advanced Physics Laboratory

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Advanced experiments in mechanics, electromagnetism, modern physics, and nuclear physics. This course also covers general laboratory practice, data analysis, and error propagation. Four hours of lab per week.
    Four hours of lab per week.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220 ; either PHYS 3190  or PHYS 3410 .
  
  • PHYS 4410 - Materials Characterization Laboratory

    Credits: (2)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: A series of experiments for advanced students employing modern methods of measurement of properties of materials. The course will teach microscopic and spectroscopic techniques and general laboratory practice, data analysis, and error propagation.
    Four hours of lab per week.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 2220  and PHYS 3410 .
  
  • PHYS 4570 - Secondary School Science Teaching Methods

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Acquaintance and practice with various teaching and assessment methods. Development of science curricula including lesson and unit plans. It is recommended that this course be completed immediately before student teaching.
    Pre-requisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
  
  • PHYS 4610 - Quantum Mechanics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Wave-particle duality, Schrodinger equation, wave function, quantization rules, one-dimensional motion, one-electron atoms, spin and orbital angular momentum.
    Pre-requisite(s): MATH 2270  and PHYS 2710 .
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: PHYS 3500 
  
  • PHYS 4620 - Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Approximation methods and other selected topics in pure and applied quantum mechanics.
    Pre-requisite(s): PHYS 4610 .
  
  • PHYS 4800 - Individual Research Problems

    Credits: (1-3)
    Description: Time and credit to be arranged. Open to qualified students for one or more semesters.
    Pre-requisite(s): Consent of instructor.
    Cross-listed with ASTR 4800 .
    May be repeated up to 10 times.
  
  • PHYS 4830 - Readings in Physics/Astronomy

    Credits: (1-3)
    Description: Topics which can be studied include (but are not limited to): mechanics, thermodynamics, kinetic theory, statistical mechanics, electronics, electromagnetism, optics, solid-state physics, modern physics, nuclear physics, relativity, cosmology, and astrophysics. These courses may be taken at any time on a personalized basis. Time and credit to be arranged.
    Pre-requisite(s): Consent of instructor.
    Cross-listed with ASTR 4830 .
    May be repeated up to 10 times.
  
  • PHYS 4890 INT - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (1-6)
    Description: A continuation of PHYS 2890 . Open to all students.
  
  • PHYS 4920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
  
  • PHYS 4970 - Senior Thesis

    Credits: (2)
    Description: An individual research program pursued under faculty supervision. It is expected that one or more semesters of research (PHYS 4800 ) will precede registration for this course. Course evaluation will include an oral and a written report.
    Pre-requisite(s): senior class standing and consent of departmental committee.
  
  • PHYS 4990 - Seminar in Physics

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Weekly presentations by students, faculty, and visitors on topics in physics and astronomy. Each student taking this course for credit will make a presentation on a topic agreed upon with a faculty mentor and the seminar instructor.
    Pre-requisite(s): previous upper division physics course.
    May be taken twice for credit.
  
  • PHYS 5030G - Physics for Teachers

    Credits: (2-3)
    Description: Science content course for teachers in the MEd Science Emphasis Program. To register, select another departmental course and develop a contract detailing additional work required for graduate credit. Contract must be approved by instructor, department chair, and Director of the Master of Education Program.
    May be repeated once up to 6 credit hours.
  
  • POLS 1010 - Introduction to Political Science

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: The purpose of this course is to define the discipline of political science. By discipline we mean the way in which political science has developed over the past 150 years. We will assess the basic sub-disciplines of political science: American, Comparative, International Relations, Political Theory, Public Administration and Public Law.
  
  • POLS 1100 AI - American National Government

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem, 1st Blk, Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Description: A study of American constitutional democracy at the national level, including political institutions, interests, ideals, and the processes through which policies are formulated and implemented.
  
  • POLS 1520 SS - Leadership and Political Life

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: The purpose of the Leadership and Political Life class is to introduce students to the theory and practice of leadership in the public realm, which is applicable to the private sector.
  
  • POLS 2100 SS SUS GLB - Introduction to International Politics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Online
    Description: Examines international political theories and concepts such as traditional Realism (power, state, and nationalism) with contrasting theories of Liberalism (globalization, organizations, and law).  Application of these theories will be examined through case studies of powerful countries and regions in addition to problems such as the refugee crises, environmental concerns, and threats of global terrorism. 
  
  • POLS 2200 SS GLB - Introduction to Comparative Politics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An introductory survey, comparing and contrasting political ideas, institutions and processes in the political systems of the world to gain a deeper knowledge of, and a broader perspective on, political phenomena.
  
  • POLS 2300 SS - Introduction to Political Theory

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An examination of the arguments behind and the implications of the dominant theories of politics. Theories that are studied include liberalism, conservatism, socialism, and republicanism, among others. In studying these theories, the works of such theorists as Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Mill will be examined.
  
  • POLS 2400 SS - Introduction to Law and Courts

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An introductory survey of law and courts emphasizing the structure of courts, different forms of law, and the various actors involved in legal conflicts.
  
  • POLS 2500 SS/DV GLB - Human Rights in the World

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Human rights (HR) are a powerful idea in the modern world, but also the focus of controversy. This course will provide students with a broad foundation in human rights including the ability to analyze HR in domestic and int’l law, examine prevention and prosecution techniques, and debate current issues at home and abroad. Emphasis will be placed on women and gender studies (including LGBT issues), vulnerable populations such as refugees, and atrocity crimes.

     

  
  • POLS 2700 - Introduction to Public Administration

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: To understand the role of public administration in the United States, this course examines the administrators who manage and implement policy, the tools they use, and the environments in which they work. We will cover the economic, political, and social dynamics within public administration as well as management challenges related to human resources, finance, program development, evaluation, and strategic planning.  Introduction to public administration would not be complete without discussions about the values and ethics unique to the public sector.  We will be using textbooks, other assigned readings, case studies, simulations of ethical quandaries, and whenever possible hands-on learning experiences.  The first half of the course will include historical milestones in the history of the administrative state, the logic of public service and the constitutional context of executive power, and management challenges for the public sector in the 21st century.  The second half of the course will focus on the policy cycle, program implementation and evaluation, budgeting, leadership and ethics, and the future of public administration.
  
  • POLS 2920 - Short Courses, Workshops, Institutes, and Special Programs

    Credits: (1-6)
    Workshop
    Description: Consult the semester class schedule for the current offering under this number. The specific title and credit authorized will appear on the student transcript.
    May be repeated for a total maximum of 6 credit hours.
    Note: Course not currently being offered.
  
  • POLS 2930 - Peacebuilding in Rwanda

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: 1st Blk
    Description: In this course, students will travel to Rwanda (Africa) to participate in a Peacebuilding Institute (PBI) with Weber State University and Never Again Rwanda. Weber State students and Rwandan University students will work together for an unforgettable academic experience. Through readings, site visits, lectures from specialists, and group discussions, students will explore themes of genocide, human rights, transitional justice, and good governance. In addition they will develop skills in cross-cultural dialogue exchange.
  
  • POLS 3070 - Moot Court

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Students in teams of two prepare appellate arguments based on a hypothetical case with Constitutional Law issues that are argued before the Supreme Court of the United States.  Students develop legal arguments and briefs for both the petitioner and the respondent for two issues based on a closed set of approximately twenty real Supreme Court cases.  Students are required to make use of existing Supreme Curt precedents in addition to arguing the facts in the hypothetical case.  Students develop, prepare, and practice their arguments with one another in class and compete against other teams in the Western Regional Moot Court competition held in November in California.  Counselors are judged by a panel typically made up of law school professors, attorneys, and graduate and law school students.
    Suggested Requisite(s): Recommend prior constitutional law and legal studies coursework, but not required.
  
  • POLS 3140 GLB - Foreign Policy of the United States

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: An analysis of the making of American foreign policy with reference to the role and influences of beliefs, interests, public opinion, media and especially the institutional struggle between President & Congress. The challenges facing contemporary U.S. foreign policy will also be examined.
  
  • POLS 3150 GLB - Model United Nations

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: A study of the current events before the United Nations General Assembly as well as in-depth research on selected countries; includes preparation for the Model United nations of the Far West and the Northern Utah Model UN.
    May be repeated once for 6 credit hours.
  
  • POLS 3151 GLB - Model United Nations Team

    Credits: (1)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course prepares students on the Model UN team for the upcoming Fall/Spring conference.
    Pre-requisite(s): POLS 3150  with a minimum grade of B. Permission of the instructor.
    May be repeated up to 12 credit hours.
  
  • POLS 3200 GLB - Middle East and North Africa

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description:  

     

     

    A survey of the political dynamics of selected states and societies in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Issues to be covered: the impact of early Middle Eastern/North African history upon today’s politics; class structures in the MENA countries and their impact on politics; the rise of Arab nationalism; Zionism; the politics of oil; the status of women; the political impact of economic restructuring; Islamic movements; state-building; and political liberalization and democratization in the Middle East and North Africa.

  
  • POLS 3210 GLB - Politics in the European Union

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course examines the origins and development of the European community/EU and its institutions, theories of integration, and challenges in the creation of a supranational authority. It also compares the impact of EU policies on domestic politics in the individual European states with emphasis on relevant issues of the day, such as EU enlargement, immigration, and the political economy.
  
  • POLS 3290 GLB - Democratization and Political Transitions

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: A survey of the democratic transitions literature with focus on political transitions in comparative perspective. This course will compare a variety of different kinds of political transitions in different regions of the world, including cases in which countries have transitioned back to authoritarianism.
  
  • POLS 3330 - American Political Thought

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: Historical examination of American thought with stress on its influences on the development of the American Government.
  
  • POLS 3340 - Environmental Political Theory

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: This is an upper division course in political theory, with the specific focus being environmental political theory.  The course examines a range of theoretical perspectives on a range of issues including how we conceptualize humans, nature, and politics.
  
  • POLS 3400 - LGBTQ Politics

    Credits: (3)
    Description: Social movements employ a variety of methods to achieve the protection of their members’ rights and interests. This course focuses on these issues through the study of gender and sexual minorities in the United States from the mid-Twentieth Century to the present. It examines the strategies, both formal and informal, adopted to achieve social change.
    Note: This course is taught during odd years.
  
  • POLS 3600 - Political Parties

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: A study of the organization and function of the American political parties, political organizations that play a role alongside political parties in the American political system, such as interest groups, and a comparative study of political parties in other countries.
  
  • POLS 3610 - Campaigns and Elections

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: A study of the electoral process in the United States with an examination of national institutional elections, state and local elections, as well as election rules. Also a study of campaigning techniques in elections at all levels.
  
  • POLS 3620 - Political Behavior

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the nature of mass political behavior and its role in the political process. Further, it examines the interaction between and among diverse social groups, the media, and policy makers. The course will also emphasize the political psychology of public opinion formation and political decision of those outside the mainstream political institutions.
  
  • POLS 3640 - Media and Politics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: In terms of influencing American politics, media perform three functions: supplying information about issues and candidates; setting the agenda for public debate; conveying messages between elected officials and the public. In this course we will focus on the effect media has on political discourse in the United States.
  
  • POLS 3700 - Bureaucratic Politics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: Presents basic theories, concepts, and analysis of current practices and problems in governmental administration.
  
  • POLS 3750 - Urban Government and Politics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem odd years
    Description: A study of local government organization and policy problems, with an emphasis on problems of the metropolitan areas.
  
  • POLS 3760 - State Government and Politics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem even years
    Description: An examination of governmental organization, operation, policy making, and electoral politics of state governments and the dynamics of relationships with other levels of government.
  
  • POLS 3780 - Lobbying: Theory and Practice

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course looks at both the theory and practice of lobbying, primarily at the state and local governmental levels; and it examines the business of lobbying, how the profession of lobbying has developed, what lobbyists do, the ethical constraints of lobbying, and from where the right to petition the government is derived.
  
  • POLS 3990 - Political Analysis

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An introduction to the scope and methods of political science. This course focuses on the formulation of hypotheses, the collection of data, appropriate study design, and study analysis through statistical testing and interpretation.
    Pre-requisite(s): POLS 1010 .
  
  • POLS 4020 - Constitutional Law: Powers

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An introduction to many of the doctrines of American Constitutional Law around the structure of the U.S. Constitution, governmental powers, and federalism. Topics include constitutional theory; congressional, executive, and judicial power; and the relationship between federal and state governments.
  
  • POLS 4030 - Constitutional Law: Rights

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: An introduction to many of the doctrines of American Constitutional Law. Topics include the study of various fundamental rights including free speech, religious freedom, equal protection, and privacy rights.
  
  • POLS 4050 - Institutional Presidency

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Summer Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: We will examine the American Presidency from four perspectives this semester. First, the course considers the creation of the presidency and “the executive power” in the Constitution. Second, it surveys the institutional development of the presidency and executive branch from the late 1700s through the present. Third, it examines different theories on the politics and effectiveness of presidential leadership. Finally, it asks whom the president represents and, having considered the institutional development of the presidency, whether the president needs more tools to fulfill expectations placed upon him or her.
    Pre-requisite(s): POLS 1100 .
  
  • POLS 4060 - Law and Society

    Credits: (3)
    Description: This course explores how law operates in society and how society influences the nature of the law. Topics may include the role of race in law, legal consciousness, efficacy of legal action, and the nature of the legal profession.
    Note: Course not currently being offered.
  
  • POLS 4100 - Free Speech

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem
    Description: This course explores the historical meaning of free speech in the United States, the modern development of free speech principles in constitutional law, and the application of those principles to modern controversies.
  
  • POLS 4160 - Topics in Global Politics

    Credits: (3)
    Variable Title
    Typically Taught Fall Semester: Full Sem
    Description: The study of selected contemporary problem areas in world politics to assess their impact within the international arena.
    May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours toward the hours required for Political Science majors and only 3 hours will be counted toward the political science minor requirement.
  
  • POLS 4170 GLB - Gender, Power, and Global Politics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically Taught Spring Semester: Full Sem, Full Sem - Online
    Description: This course is a comprehensive introduction to the gendered nature of global politics and how power and gender influences the world around us. During the semester, we will examine what cultural, structural, and political factors shape gendered access to power worldwide. We will discuss why women have succeeded in obtaining sustainable political power in some countries and not others. We will determine what factors influence why women and transgendered individuals are excluded from political processes and not represented proportionately in political, influential, or leadership positions. At the conclusion of this course, students will be familiar with multiple approaches to understand how gender matters in many facets of world politics and how gender can intersect with other social identities such as race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation.
 

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