Apr 19, 2018  
2018-2019 Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Catalog

Course Descriptions - SCM and MIS


Department of Supply Chain & Management Information Systems Go to Business Admin website

Courses

  • MIS 1100 SS - The Digital Society

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem, Full Sem Online]
    Spring [Full Sem, Full Sem Online]
    Summer [Full Sem Online]


    The explosive growth of information technologies in general, and the Internet in particular, has irreversibly changed the way we work and play. This course prepares students to be knowledgeable citizens of cyberspace. It reviews our social institutions and how they are being impacted by information technology as well as the ways in which technology has been shaped by our social institutions. The course also provides hands-on experience with a variety of Internet tools.
  • MIS 2010 - Business Computer Skills

    Credits: (1)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem Online]
    Spring [Full Sem Online]
    Summer [Full Sem Online]


    This course prepares all students in business and economics to demonstrate current competence in desktop software commonly used in the business environment. The course covers computer competencies students will use in their business functional and cross-functional core courses, using more complex features of desktop software. It is followed by a hands-on exam that tests these competencies. Credit/No credit.
  • MIS 2015 - Introduction to Information Systems & Technologies

    Credits: (1)
    Typically taught:
    Not currently being offered

    This course introduces the student to the role played by computer technology in business strategy and problem resolution. It also introduces information technologies used in information systems, including: software development, hardware, operating systems, network management, project planning, and career paths. Students will develop their academic MIS program plan. Lecture series by MIS Faculty.
  • MIS 2020 - Introduction to Information Systems

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]
    Summer [Full Sem]


    Overview of the role and use of information systems to support individual, group, and business decision-making. Includes coverage of technology’s role in supporting the business decision-making process. It will prepare students to use information technologies effectively to improve productivity and promote competitive position in the marketplace. Prerequisite: MIS 2010 .
  • MIS 2030 - Introduction to Business Analytics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    Business analytics refer to the ways in which organizations use data to gain insights and make better decisions, and has become a critical capability for organizations of all types and sizes. It is applied in various business functions including marketing, finance, human resources, operation and strategic planning. This course covers basic analytic methods used by organizations. Students will learn how to explore, manipulate and present data. They will also learn how to use data to develop insights and predictive capabilities by using predictive analytics techniques. Prerequisite: MATH 1040  or QUAN 2600 .
  • MIS 2110 - Software Development I

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of software construction using a contemporary programming language. This includes the IDE (Integrated Development Environment), syntaxes of the language, basic programming constructs, data representation, object concepts, programming flow control and problem solving logic. Students will design, program and debug several business application projects. Prerequisite: MATH 1050 .
  • MIS 2410 - Information Systems Architecture

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Not currently being offered

    This course provides students with a thorough grounding in computer hardware and operating system software, peripheral devices and contemporary information system architecture, including its structure, theory, and applications.
  • MIS 2720 - Data Structures and Algorithms

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Not currently being offered

    This course introduces the basics of specifying abstract data types, control structures and modularization, and using them to design programs. Commonly used data structures and algorithms are studied. Emphasis is made on choosing data structures and algorithms appropriate for solving given business problems. Prerequisite: MATH 1050  and MIS 2110 .
  • MIS 2891 - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (1)
    Open to all associate’s degree-seeking students who have been selected to serve an internship in the information technology field or who have identified a special MIS project with their current employer, subject to approval by the Management Information Systems Department. Prerequisite: Department Approval.
  • MIS 2892 - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (2)
    Open to all associate’s degree-seeking students who have been selected to serve an internship in the information technology field or who have identified a special MIS project with their current employer, subject to approval by the Management Information Systems Department. Prerequisite: Department Approval.
  • MIS 2893 - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (3)
    Open to all associate’s degree-seeking students who have been selected to serve an internship in the information technology field or who have identified a special MIS project with their current employer, subject to approval by the Management Information Systems Department. Prerequisite: Department Approval.
  • MIS 2894 - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (4)
    Open to all associate’s degree-seeking students who have been selected to serve an internship in the information technology field or who have identified a special MIS project with their current employer, subject to approval by the Management Information Systems Department. Prerequisite: Department Approval.
  • MIS 3210 - Database Design and Implementation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    This course provides a comprehensive coverage of business database systems. Students will learn how to design, implement and manage databases. They will learn both GUI interface and how to use the Structured Query Language (SQL). They will also gain experience in using an enterprise level, multi-user database. Prerequisite: MATH 1050  and MIS 2110 , or MIS 2020 .
  • MIS 3220 - Business Intelligence

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    This course provides an understanding of the concepts of Business Intelligence (BI) as an information technology approach of data collection and data analysis to help enterprise users make better managerial decisions. The course explores the detailed discussion of the analysis, design, and implementation of systems for BI including enterprise data-warehousing, knowledge management systems, big data, and text mining.  The course will help students learn analytical components and technologies to integrate, analyze and report data.  The course will utilize Microsoft BI tools including Microsoft Power BI desktop, SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS), SQL Server Analysis Services (SSAS) and SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS). Prerequisite: MIS 2030 .
  • MIS 3230 - Data Mining for Business

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    This course will examine how data mining technologies can be used to improve decision-making. Students will study the principles and techniques of data mining, including gaining knowledge of the algorithms and computational paradigms that allow computers to find patterns in large datasets.  Students will examine real-world examples and cases to place data-mining techniques in context, to develop data-analytic thinking, and to illustrate that proper application is as much an art as it is a science. Prerequisite: MIS 2030 .
  • MIS 3610 - Networks & Data Communications I

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    This course provides an introduction to the design, operation, and management of telecommunication systems. It covers computer network definitions, concepts and principles, including (but not limited to): server management; topologies; protocols; standards; and fundamental concepts related to data communication networks. Prerequisite: MIS 2020  or MIS 2410 .
  • MIS 3620 - Networks and Data Communications II

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]

    In this intensive hands-on course, the student will acquire the skills and techniques needed to configure, troubleshoot and support reliable TCP/IP internetworks. The student will learn the essentials of building an internetwork, including routing, configuring the Domain Name Server (DNS), setting up and managing a web server, configuring a firewall and IDS, and standards-based email. Students will also participate in configuring clients, redesigning networks and troubleshooting routing. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899  and MIS 3610 .
  • MIS 3700 - E-business Technologies & Web Development

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Spring [Full Sem]

    This course provides students with knowledge of technologies needed in planning, implementing and supporting web-hosted applications and on-line commerce. Topics include web and commerce server design and deployment, search engines n-tier web architecture and supporting software, client-side/server-side programming with data-bound controls and session management, e-business application languages, markup languages, on-line payment mechanisms, systems reliability and security, scalability analysis, and solutions sourcing. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899  and MIS 2110 , or MIS 2020 .
  • MIS 3710 - Global Issues in Information Technology

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    This course shows how information technology is used as a key competitive advantage by multinational and transnational businesses. Topics include global perspectives on coordination and control, cultural dimensions, and geo-political considerations of global information technology applications. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 .
  • MIS 3720 - Software Development II

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Not currently being offered

    This course builds on the software development skills learned in Software Development I. Topics include class hierarchies, inheritance and interfaces, object aggregation, data structure and collections, file management, threading, network programming, and the design of multi-tiered, distributed computing applications involving relational databases. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899  and MIS 2720 .
  • MIS 3730 - Systems Analysis and Design

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Not currently being offered

    This course provides the knowledge and skills to design and implement computer-based systems to solve business problems. Topics include feasibility studies, requirement analysis, system design and development, implementation and testing. Students will learn the use of appropriate methodologies and tools, including object-oriented modeling and the use of computer-aided software engineering (CASE). Prerequisite: BSAD 2899  and MIS 3210 .
  • MIS 3740 - Business Machine Learning

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    This course is designed to teach and give students hands-on experience with cutting-edge machine learning methods used frequently in business contexts.  Many companies have made significant contributions to the field of data analytics with products and services they’ve launched.  This class is designed to prepare students to participate in such analysis to make significant business impact.  We examine Netflix- and Amazon-style recommender systems and market basket analyses, customer segmentation and classification, Zillow-style prediction of home sale prices, and other business-relevant examples. Prerequisite: MIS 2030 .
  • MIS 3750 - Electronic Business Communications

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Not currently being offered

    This course gives students knowledge regarding the best practices in designing or developing electronic presentations, meetings, and collaborations. This course also familiarizes students with technologies fostering effective communication in virtual situations. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 , MGMT 3200  or PS 3250 .
  • MIS 4600 - Information Security I

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    This course looks at management issues and practical implications related to securing information systems.  This course focuses on the threat environment, security policy and planning, cryptography, secure networks, access control, firewalls, host hardening, application security, data protection, incident response, and networking and a review of TCP/IP. Prerequisite: Business Foundations; BSAD 2899  and MIS 2020 , or MIS 3610 .
  • MIS 4620 - Information Security Basics

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Not currently being offered

    In a computer-literate age, sophisticated criminals use computers in their illegal and destructive activities. This course discusses cybercrime and teaches students to understand networks; the phases of computer hacking; and setting up a secure environment. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899  and MIS 2410  or MIS 3610 .
  • MIS 4700 - Information Security II

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Spring [Full Sem]

    This course covers the basic principles and concepts in information security and information assurance. It examines the technical, operational, and organizational issues of securing information systems. Topics include operating system issues, viruses, security awareness at the executive, technical and user levels, physical security, personnel security issues, policies, procedures, and the need for an enterprise security organization. Case studies and exercises in the computer lab will be used to provide examples of the need for organizations to develop security procedures and policies. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899  and MIS 4600 .
  • MIS 4710 - Enterprise Software Development

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Spring [Full Sem]

    This course introduces students to the concept of a business as an integrated set of business processes and associated systems designed to deliver value to customers. It focuses on enterprise systems, product lifecycle management, and supply chain management. This course also focuses on how to effectively manage enterprise projects with respect to organizational constraints. Students will learn how to manage project initiation, planning, execution, monitoring and closing. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899  and MIS 2020 .
  • MIS 4720 - Emerging Information Technologies

    Credits: (3)
    Variable Title
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]

    New information technologies can give early adopters significant competitive advantage when used with careful planning, or they can mean disaster if hastily implemented. This course covers how to conduct an environmental scan toward evaluating and implementing new information technologies. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 , and MIS 2410 , or MIS 2020 .
  • MIS 4730 - IT Project Management and Systems Design

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    This course covers project management principles, methodology, and tools. It also provides the knowledge and skills to design and implement computer-based systems to solve business problems. Topics include the planning and management of IT and software development projects, requirement analysis, system design and development, implementation and testing. Prerequisite: Business Foundations; BSAD 2899  and MIS 3210   and MIS 3610  and MIS 2110 .
  • MIS 4801 - Individual Projects

    Credits: (1)
    This course is open only to senior MIS majors. Students will be required to complete an individual project, program, system, or research paper which will enhance their skills and marketability. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 , Management Information Systems Department approval, and Senior standing.
  • MIS 4802 - Individual Projects

    Credits: (2)
    This course is open only to senior MIS majors. Students will be required to complete an individual project, program, system, or research paper which will enhance their skills and marketability. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 , Management Information Systems Department approval, and Senior standing.
  • MIS 4803 - Individual Projects

    Credits: (3)
    This course is open only to senior MIS majors. Students will be required to complete an individual project, program, system, or research paper which will enhance their skills and marketability. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 , Management Information Systems Department approval, and Senior standing.
  • MIS 4810 - Experimental Courses

    Credits: (1-3)
    Experimental or one-time courses designed to fill a need in the community or investigate interesting and unusual topics. May be repeated 5 times with a maximum of 6 credit hours with different topics.
  • MIS 4850 - Information Systems & Technology Study Abroad

    Credits: (1-3)
    This course is designed for students who wish to explore information systems and technology theory and practice in countries other than the U.S.  Students will study global information systems as offered through a partner university (or other university with department chair approval). Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 . May be repeated once up to 6 credits.
  • MIS 4891 - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (1)
    Prerequisite: Management Information Systems Department Approval.
  • MIS 4892 - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (2)
    Prerequisite: Management Information Systems Department Approval.
  • MIS 4893 - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (3)
    Prerequisite: Management Information Systems Department Approval.
  • MIS 4894 - Cooperative Work Experience

    Credits: (4)
    Prerequisite: Management Information Systems Department Approval.
  • MIS 5930G - Professional Development Workshop in Information Technology

    Credits: (1-4)
    Information technology professionals must remain current with new technologies to remain competitive in their careers. This course offers professional development in new systems and software as they enter the mainstream of information technology practice. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
  • MIS 6610 - Information and Communications Technologies for e-Business

    Credits: (3)
    Covers the information and communications technology infrastructure required to support a robust e-business activity. Issues such as reliability, scalability, security, and responsiveness as well as n-tier architectures are reviewed. Prerequisite: MACC, MBA, or MIS Certificate program standing.
  • MIS 6620 - Databases & Information Systems

    Credits: (3)
    This course covers the role of database technology in information systems. Through hands-on and conceptual knowledge, students will learn how databases are used to construct and operate information systems designed to support decision making. Various aspects of database systems including both correct methods and problems encountered during the design, implementation and operation of database systems will be covered. Students will gain hands-on familiarity with a relational database system. Prerequisite: Admittance to MACC or MBA program and MIS 2020  or equivalent.
  • MIS 6800 - Directed Studies

    Credits: (1)
    Directed individual study and research on special topics related to information assurance. May be repeated for a cumulative total of three credit hours. Prerequisite: Approval of Management Information Systems Department Chair and course instructor.
  • SCM 3050 - Operations and Supply Chain Management

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]
    Summer [Full Sem]


    Supply chain management is the value creation engine of every organization.  The focus of this course is to acquaint students with the core elements of supply chain management: 1) customer value, 2) collaborative value creation, and 3) systems thinking.  The course introduces and defines the three primary functions that compose supply chain activities- 1) purchasing, 2) operations, and 3) logistics-and shows how they need to work together to create the high-quality, low-cost, and innovative products and services that customers expect to find in today’s marketplace.  Important analytical tools are introduced. Prerequisite: MATH 1050 .
  • SCM 3500 - Spreadsheet Modeling for Decision-Making

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    Spreadsheet software enables business people to model and analyze quantitative problems in a wide variety of business contexts.  This course covers spreadsheet modeling in terms of optimization models for deciding the best set of decisions to meet constraints and performance objectives; simulation models for considering uncertainty in business operations and decisions; and other decision models and tools.  Through conceptual and applied topics, this course will enhance one’s problems solving and modeling capabilities as well as Excel spreadsheet skills. Prerequisite: MIS 2010 , QUAN 2600 .
  • SCM 3600 - Logistics & Transportation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Spring [Full Sem]

    This course incorporates readings, site visits, and case analysis to convey state-of-the-art and emerging business logistics practices. The focus of this course is on forecasting, inventory management, transportation, distribution and warehousing, with an introduction to contemporary issues in logistics such HADR and sustainability.  Development of leading-edge strategies, which promote a firm’s ability to differentiate itself in terms of its supply chain performance is emphasized. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 ; SCM 3050 .  Prerequisite/Co-requisite: SCM 3500 .

     

  • SCM 3700 - Purchasing & Strategic Sourcing

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Spring [Full Sem]

    This course provides students an introduction to the supply management discipline, focusing on the development of category management skills and the purchasing process.  Companies have always sourced a large percent of their COGS–up to 50-80%.  However, today’s emphasis on core competencies and increased use of outsourcing makes sourcing even more strategic.  Sourcing managers are responsible for managing supplier capacity and capabilities.  The course emphasizes costing and relationship management tools.  This course builds the foundation for students to pass the Certified Profession in Supply Management (CPSM) exam. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 ; SCM 3050 . Prerequisite/Co-requisite: SCM 3500 .
  • SCM 4100 - Quality Management and Process Improvement

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    Introduces principles and practices for achieving quality, customer satisfaction, and performance excellence.  Emphasis on process improvement, problem-solving, variation and statistical thinking, customer and supplier relationships, service quality, employee involvement, project management, and quality management frameworks.  Presents tools and methods for analyzing and improving business processes, including Six Sigma, lean, and theory of constraints. This course builds the foundation for students to pass the ASQ Certified Quality Process Analyst exam. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 ; QUAN 3610 ; SCM 3050 ; or Instructor Permission.
  • SCM 4400 - Global Supply Chain Management

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Spring [Full Sem]

    Globalization has changed the rules of competition.  Globalization also raises complex and controversial issues such as job displacement and worker exploitation.  Winning companies now use worldwide resources to meet the needs of global consumers.  This course introduces and is built around a scanning model.  Students are expected to actively scan, using emerging information to identify inflection points and determine their strategic and tactical implication.  From this analysis, strategic objectives are renewed to guide the design of a global supply chain.  Effective communication and teamwork are emphasized via the in class activities and projects. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899  and SCM 3050 .
  • SCM 4500 - Supply Chain Relational Strategies

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]

    This course focuses on the soft side of supply chain management, addressing both the internal (including individual) and external relationships that allow a supply chain to function. Key elements of the course include the perspective on supply chain strategic relationships, managing cultural disparities and conflict between businesses and functional units within them, and change management issues. Students will learn core processes around initial exploration and assessment of supply chain relationships, establish metrics/expectations for the relationship, craft and manage teams and work groups, and develop negotiation skills. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 ; SCM 3050 , SCM 3500 , SCM 3600 , SCM 3700 ; MGMT 3200  or PS 3250 ; should be taken concurrently with SCM 4550 .
  • SCM 4550 - Strategic Supply Chain Design

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]

    Supply chain management is integrative in nature, requiring a systems approach to process design and management. The goal is to co-create value across organizational boundaries. This capstone SCM course emphasizes the analytical aspects of identifying the right capabilities required to design a collaborative business model and create distinctive customer value. This analysis answers the question, “Who should be on the value-creation team?” The course is designed as a collaborative laboratory, employing extensive experiential learning and case analysis. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 ; SCM 3050 , SCM 3500 , SCM 3600 , SCM 3700 ; MGMT 3200  or PS 3250 ; should be taken concurrently with SCM 4500 , but can be taken after.
  • SCM 4700 - Supply Chain Case Analysis, Logic, and Presentation

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]


    This course is designed around the case analysis methodology and has the explicit goal of preparing student teams for participation in specific competitive supply chain case competitions (both regionally and nationally). Preparation time will be extensive and students must possess an advanced level of SCM mastery prior to enrollment in this class. Class meetings will be scheduled with the students throughout the semester for presentation and preparation. Please see the instructor for information on enrollment eligibility.  Credit/no credit grading. Prerequisite: SCM 3050 , instructor approval.
  • SCM 4800 - Independent Research

    Credits: (1-3)
    Directed research and study on an individual basis. Prerequisite: Business Foundations; BSAD 2899 ; Senior Standing; Written Instructor Approval. May be repeated until a total of 4 hours credit is accumulated.
  • SCM 4850 - Supply Chain Management Study Abroad

    Credits: (1-3)
    This course is designed for students who wish to explore supply chain management theory and practice in countries other than the U.S.  Students will study global supply chain management as offered through a partner university (or other university with department chair approval). Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 . Can be repeated once up to 6 credits.
  • SCM 4860 - Supply Chain Management Internship

    Credits: (3)
    Typically taught:
    Fall [Full Sem]
    Spring [Full Sem]
    Summer [Full Sem]


    A structured professional-level field experience. The student will be counseled and supervised as he/she applies and integrates the knowledge and skills obtained through operations management and logistics courses. Prerequisite: BSAD 2899 ; Senior Standing; Instructor approval.